Should someone turn themselves in to police before getting an attorney? 101 Answers as of June 11, 2013

Should someone turn themselves in before getting an attorney?

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Night Life Lawyers
Night Life Lawyers | Joshua Aldabbagh
No. An attorney can advise you on how to proceed, i.e. whether turning yourself in is even necessary, and can help ensure that no damaging statements are made to the police.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/8/2011
Lowenstein Law Office
Lowenstein Law Office | Anthony Lowenstein
It depends on several factors.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/4/2011
Boske Law Offices
Boske Law Offices | Michael A Boske
No, you should always contact an attorney ahead of time.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 8/1/2011
Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
It depends upon the charges. My general advise is absolutely not. Consult with an attorney first. The police are not necessarily your friend. They are investigating a case and trying to put something together to present to the prosecutor for charging. Remember, the burden of proving a case is upon the police and prosecutor. The defendant needs prove nothing and "anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law". Talk with an attorney.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 7/30/2011
Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
No! You should always speak to an attorney BEFORE giving any statements to the police. An attorney will inform you of your rights and guide you through the process. Often times during interrogation or investigation, police officers will attempt to illicit incriminating statements to help the District Attorney build a case against you. Too many times will an officer tell a defendant that, if they are truthful, they will drop or reduce some criminal charges. This just isn't up to the officer. The District Attorney is the office that is in charge of prosecuting individuals - not police officers. Therefore, officers have no say in whether a case will result in reduced or dismissed criminal charges.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/30/2011
    Josh W. Thacker, Attorney at Law
    Josh W. Thacker, Attorney at Law | Josh Thacker
    I usually recommend that someone with an outstanding warrant contact a lawyer and have that lawyer coordinate a date and time (and possible bond) before they turn themselves in. However this must be done as quickly as possible.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Rudolph F. X. Migliore, P. C.
    Rudolph F. X. Migliore, P. C. | Rudolph F. X. Migliore
    It is always best to retain an attorney first as significant constitutional protections apply with the presence of an attorney, the earlier the better.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    No, no. No!
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Healan Law Offices
    Healan Law Offices | William D. Healan, III
    If you know there is a warrant for your arrest, it is probably better to go ahead and hire an attorney to help you with the booking and bonding process and to make sure you are properly advised about not making any incriminating statements.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    No. Get an attorney before you speak to the police. If you have an open warrant you can go directly to the court that issued the warrant. The police will arrest you, take you into custody, and the bring you to court the next business day. It looks far better for a person to turn himself into the court than to have the police bring him before the judge. I rarely, if ever, advise a client to speak with the police. Their job is to gather evidence to prosecute. If you surrender yourself to the court, you should do so with your attorney present. You are far less likely to be held on bail if the court sees that you have already hired counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Correia-Champa & Mailhot
    Correia-Champa & Mailhot | Susan Correia Champa
    I would advise you get an attorney in order to make arrangements to turn yourself in, immediately.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A.
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A. | Michael D. Fluke
    Having an attorney can be critical in the turn in process. I suggest you consult a local Criminal Defense attorney to discuss your case in greater detail and learn all of your rights and options.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law | Eric James Schurman
    Absolutely not!
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Frances R. Johnson
    Frances R. Johnson | Frances R. Johnson
    A person can turn him/herself in and exercise his/her right to silence and immediately, clearly, request an attorney and continuing the demand for an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Ideally you get an attorney first to protect your rights.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Michael J. Kennedy
    Good Grief No. You would let evidentiary cats out of the bag that no attorney, even I, could corral and stuff back in. It is always a bad idea to talk to the cops and submit to their authority without counsel. I always charge more when people are dumb enough to do that, because my battle thereby becomes needlessly more up-hill than otherwise.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Offices of Jeffery A. Cojocar, PC
    Law Offices of Jeffery A. Cojocar, PC | Jeffery A. Cojocar
    No, always retain counsel before hand.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    Always contact legal counsel before turning yourself in. An attorney can tell you if it is even necessary and if it is how to go about it. Remember never give a statement to the police exercise your right to remain silent.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Gutin and Wolverton
    Gutin and Wolverton | Harley Gutin
    NO.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Offices of James A Bates
    Law Offices of James A Bates | James A Bates
    NO. You need advice first. The attorney needs to tell you not to answer any questions from cops unless you have an attorney present. And probably not even then. You only give them your name, address and driver's license.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Laguzzi Law, P.C.
    Laguzzi Law, P.C. | Carina Laguzzi
    You can but hiring an attorney ahead of time can make the experience a little better. However, NEVER give a statement without consulting an attorney first. Your attorney should be present if you do give a statement.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    If you have a warrant, you should first meet with a lawyer and get them on board. That way if you have any documents to share, you can share them then. Also, it is easier in the event that you do not make bond that the lawyer interview you fully in their office. And, if there is a bond issue, the lawyer can be on board to help address it when you turn yourself in. (For example, in some family violence cases the bond is set at $0 until a magistrate's order for emergency protection is in place. The lawyer can help you turn yourself in to the court and get the bond set so you can get bonded out immediately. If a bond is too high, the lawyer may be able to get it reduced so that you do not spend too much in paying the bondsman.)
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    John Segelbaum, P.S.
    John Segelbaum, P.S. | John Segelbaum
    As a general rule you should contact an attorney before turning yourself in or even having any conversation with the police. The best advice is not to make any statements to the police. If the police intend to arrest you, the attorney can arrange for a voluntary surrender. However, many times, the police will not arrest if they know you have an attorney and will not answer questions, although it depends on the case and the officer involved. Contact my office for a free consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Christopher Lee
    NO. You should always have an attorney present when speaking with a police officer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Offices of Matthew Murillo
    Law Offices of Matthew Murillo | Matthew Murillo
    No. Never. You have a right to an attorney. Exercise it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Rodney Nosratabadi
    Law Office of Rodney Nosratabadi | Rodney Nosratabadi
    Even if you decide to turn yourself in prior to getting attorney make sure you say nothing to the cops. But it's a imperative that you speak with an attorney before you turn yourself in.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    It is always best to consult with an attorney prior to police contact. The more serious the case the more help the attorney can be. If you cannot afford an attorney, say nothing to the police other than "I want an attorney"
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Gonzalez Law Associates P.C.
    Gonzalez Law Associates P.C. | Carlos Gonzalez
    If you're hiring an attorney do so before turning yourself in, generally it makes the process move significantly faster and smoother and you're usually in front of a judge much faster as well...
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    No you should not speak with law enforcement before speaking with an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/9/2011
    Law Office of Geoffrey M. Yaryan
    Law Office of Geoffrey M. Yaryan | Geoffrey M. Yaryan
    My advice would be no. Retain an attorney to deal with the police.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/9/2011
    Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC
    Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC | Lacy Fields
    Absolutely not! An attorney can speak with the prosecutor and arrange release terms prior to your turn-in. In other words, they can get a bond reduction lined up before you are ever taken into custody. Otherwise your bond will be arbitrarily set and you may have to sit in jail while you wait to 1) hire and attorney, and then 2) have the attorney appear before a judge to request a bond reduction.

    If you need help, please feel free to contact my office.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 5/3/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    I would advise hiring an attorney prior to submitting to the authorities.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 5/3/2011
    Harris Law Firm
    Harris Law Firm | Jennifer C. Robins
    If you are able to retain a private attorney prior to turning yourself in on a warrant, you should. The attorney may be able to work out a turn in date and prepare for a release hearing, or arrange for a release with the court and the prosecutor. If you are unable to retain an attorney, the court will not appoint an attorney until you turn yourself in.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/3/2011
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre | Jonathan T. Sarre
    Absolutely not!!! Always always always always hire an attorney first. Then your attorney will advise you on surrendering yourself or turning yourself in (or not), plus your lawyer will also advise you on what to tell the police (nothing!). Don't turn yourself in without a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/2/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    Turning yourself in without an attorney can be a good idea. It will depend on your particular case. Generally, if you have an attorney when you turn yourself in, the attorney can already have contacted the officer in charge and perhaps agree that the bond will be a personal bond. Without an attorney, the magistrate and officer in charge will be discussing bond options without your having an attorney at arraignment. In short, it is better to have an attorney present, and becomes more important the more serious the charges. If you need to retain an attorney, you may contact me for an appointment.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/2/2011
    The Law Office of B. Elaine Jones
    The Law Office of B. Elaine Jones | B. Elaine Jones
    It would be better to get the attorney first in most instances. For example, if there is a warrant for your arrest, if you hire the attorney, they can arrange for you to turn yourself in and possibly get a bond and spend minimal time in jail. I hope my answer helped you with your dilemma.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 5/2/2011
    The Law Offices of Dustan Neyland
    The Law Offices of Dustan Neyland | Dustan Neyland
    Absolutely not! You should hire an attorney first. An attorney can help you obtain a bond without being arrested and can even help lower your bond amount if one has been set.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 4/30/2011
    The Woods Law Firm
    The Woods Law Firm | F.W. Woods Jr.
    No.
    Answer Applies to: South Carolina
    Replied: 6/11/2013
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    There are advantages both ways. If you have a lawyer already, you are prepared when asked questions to say - ask my lawyer. A lawyer can explain the process to you, help you get the bond set - if there is no bond set already, etc.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 5/1/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    It is far better to know your legal rights rather than waiving them.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/2/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    Absolutely not! Hire an attorney before making another move. As a former prosecutor, I can tell you that I sent a lot of people to prison because they were kind enough to confess. You have the right to be silent. Use it and also exercise your right to get an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/1/2011
    Law Office of Michael Brodsky
    Law Office of Michael Brodsky | Michael Brodsky
    While not absolutely necessary, an attorney can often negotiate a surrender that avoids the late night knock on the door or an embarrasing arrest at your workplace. An attorney also may be able to negotiate a "book and release" with the prosecutor. Finally hiring an attorney will also provide you with important knowledge regarding your rights and how to protect those rights. Please note that this is not legal advice and does not create an attorney-client relationship. This post represents only the posters opinion. You should speak to an attorney for further information. The poster is licensed only in the State of Washington. For more information about our law firm and services, please visit our website.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/2/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    What are they turning themselves in for an outstanding warrant, questioning? While, it's not necessary to retain a lawyer before turning yourself over to police, it's not a bad idea. It's good to at least talk to an attorney before so you have an idea of what to expect and what will go on. An attorney can advise you on what to say or what not to say or if you should speak to the police at all.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    This response is general information only and does not establish an attorney client relationship. However, I would need to know a lot more information such as, what are the charges, is there a prior record and if so what is it, is there already a warrant out for arrest, etc.. You probably should hire or at least consult with an attorney for advice as to whether you should surrender yourself. Also an attorney can assist you in the surrender process and go with you to the police station.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 6/11/2013
    Arnold & Wadsworth
    Arnold & Wadsworth | Brian Arnold
    No. You should have an attorney with you through the whole process.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 5/1/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    You should definitely consult with an attorney before contacting the police. Your attorney will be able to advise you on how best to proceed and how to keep from incriminating yourself. If you are seeking legal representation in Louisiana, we invite you to contact our firm at the information on this page for a free case evaluation.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    If the want to talk with you then you should at least speak with an attorney. Anything you say can and will be used against you and it is always wise to talk with a criminal lawyer before you talk with a cop. If they have enough evidence to charge you then they will, if they don't you may be giving them just what they need. Lawyer up first to avoid handing them a conviction!
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    It always makes sense to talk with a lawyer before you have any contact with the police, if possible.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Robert Mortland
    Robert Mortland | Law Office of Robert Mortland
    I would advise getting an attorney before speaking to the police. The police do not have your best interest in mind.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/1/2011
    Law Office of Sam Levine, LLC
    Law Office of Sam Levine, LLC | Sam L. Levine
    Get an attorney if at all possible prior to turning yourself in. It would be preferable to have the attorney escort you to the police precinct & take it from there.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    We are The Goolsby Law Firm, LLC. You should both turn yourself in AND get family and friends to help you retain an experienced criminal attorney. Of course, your attorney will advise you as to all your Constitutional rights, including your right to counsel and your right to remain silent, along with all your other rights and options. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Harrison & Harrison
    Harrison & Harrison | Samuel Harrison
    As a general rule, NO. If the police want you, sooner or later you are going to need an attorney.It makes much more sense to retain the attorney, discuss your case, decide how to proceed, and then report to the police.In some jurisdictions the attorney may be able to get the prosecution to agree to a bond amount before or shortly after you turn yourself in.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    If the police contact you it is to get information, a confession, admissions, and to gather evidence against you. You should never talk to the police. The only way to handle the situation is to retain an experienced criminal attorney in your area and have him surrender you to the police. They will book and mug you and then bring you into court. In Manhattan that can take 36 hours and you will be in jail for that period. A good attorney can try to avoid this and you will only be in the police station or in custody for a few hours. Feel free to call for a consultation.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    You need an attorney to advise you. In fact, it would be best if the attorney accompanied you. Otherwise, heaven knows what a magnificent job you will do at incriminating yourself left and right.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    I would recommend to consult with an attorney prior to turning yourself in or going in for questioning.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    If there is an arrest warrant, yes but do not say anything. Do not answer questions or provide any information. Turning self in should reduce bail. If you can reach a lawyer by all means that is better.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law
    William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law | William C. Gosnell
    No hire a lawyer first, have a consultation with the lawyer then turn yourself in. He or she will advise you that you that anything you say will be used against you.
    Answer Applies to: Tennessee
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Kelly A. Broadbent, Esq.
    Kelly A. Broadbent, Esq. | Kelly Broadbent
    I would never suggest turning oneself over to the police without consulting an attorney first. It is much better to have your attorney advise you as to whether or not you should make any statements that could be used against you.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady | Kevin O'Grady
    If a person is pending a charge or has to turn himself in, it is always advisable to have already hired an attorney. When you turn yourself in you could be subject to interrogation.
    Answer Applies to: Hawaii
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    California Criminal Defense Center
    California Criminal Defense Center | Ardalon Fakhimi
    You should always consult with an attorney FIRST to advise you on how best to surrender yourself and to help you make the necessary preparations. Be sure to consult with an attorney who has considerable experience in this area. Following the wrong advise can create a tremendous amount of difficulties with your case.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Office of Cotter C. Conway
    Law Office of Cotter C. Conway | Cotter C. Conway
    It would be unwise to surrender to the authorities before retaining an attorney. Most agencies will attempt to interrogate an individual at the moment of surrender. Anything that is then said will be used against the individual at trial. Having an attorney will curtail such an interrogation. Furthermore, an attorney may be able to arrange for an immediate release upon surrender (depending upon the charges).
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Office of Alton William Wiley, Jr.
    Law Office of Alton William Wiley, Jr. | Alton William Wiley, Jr.
    I would suggest that you contact an attorney first before surrendering yourself. The main reason being that there won't be any dispute later whether you invoked your right to counsel. Furthermore, a good criminal attorney will advise the police that you are not going to waive your fifth amendment right to counsel. I would also recommend that you contact counsel as soon as possible if you believe there is a warrant out for your arrest.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    NO!!! Do not turn yourself in without the benefit of having an attorney present with you. Otherwise, once you're in police custody, they can keep you for as long as they want and question you just as long. Having an attorney with you when you surrender often makes a big difference. Don't be "penniwise and pound foolish" as the old adage goes. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Only if you like sitting in jail and being bussed to the court holding pen in chains and an orange jump suit.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    NO! And do not talk to the cops without an attorney!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    Yes. Attorney will protect you from saying something that will hurt your case.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    NOLA Criminal Law
    NOLA Criminal Law | Townsend Myers
    If you are going to hire an attorney anyway, I would strongly suggest going ahead and hiring the attorney BEFORE turning yourself in to the police. An experienced attorney can: Help protect an arrested subjects rights after arrest Insure that a bond is set in a timely manner Insure that bond is set at an appropriate amount Make a motion to reduce a bond that has been set too high Recommend a reputably bonding company to post bond Assist in the possible release of a defendant on their own recognizance.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    ABSOLUTELY NOT. You must contact an attorney before anything.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Offices of Carl Spector
    Law Offices of Carl Spector | Carl Spector
    If you know in advance that you are going to be charged with a crime, then it is best to hire an attorney first and have the attorney try to arrange a surrender for you with the police. This would go a long way in protecting your constitutional rights and may even help with a lower bail, if bail is warranted.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers | Alexander Sanchez
    No. Absolutely not. Hire an attorney before you surrender. Without a lawyer the police will try to extract statements from you, which might be incriminating. There is no benefit, whatsoever, of surrendering without a lawyer. Furthermore, a lawyer my be able to provide information to the police which is helpful to your case, and obtain information from the police which is also helpful. Advice: Hire a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O.
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O. | Eric R. Chandler
    No, it is almost always a good idea to speak to a lawyer beforehand.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Lisa Mulligan Law Offices, LLC
    Lisa Mulligan Law Offices, LLC | Lisa Mulligan
    No, it's best to speak with a lawyer first to make sure you don't say something that could make your situation worse.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Mercado & Hartung
    Mercado & Hartung | Stephanie Hartung
    It is always advisable that you consult an attorney before incriminating yourself. I am not sure what you need to "turn yourself in" for, and doing so is certainly the right action, but it is worth your time to at least speak with an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    The Law Offices of Mark Kotlarsky
    The Law Offices of Mark Kotlarsky | Mark Kotlarsky
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 6/11/2013
    Law Office of Thomas J. Ogas
    Law Office of Thomas J. Ogas | Thomas Ogas
    No.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/11/2013
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman | Gabriel Dorman
    No. If you are wanted by the police for any reason you should first seek the advice and help of an experienced criminal defense attorney. If you turn yourself in to the police on your own, there will be no one there to protect you. Anything you say or do will be used against you. A criminal defense attorney's role is to stand between you and the government and/or your accusers in an effort to defend you against criminal wrongdoing. I hope this answer was helpful. Good luck
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Offices of Jack N. Whitaker
    Law Offices of Jack N. Whitaker | Jack Nathan Whitaker
    No.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/11/2013
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    In general, it is usually wise to consult with an attorney before making any decisions regarding your matter.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Avioli Law, P.C.
    Avioli Law, P.C. | Michael Avioli
    Never. In the 27 years of practice I have never presented someone to cops after I was hired. Never should you turn yourself in.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman | Scott G. Hilderman
    Absolutely Not! You need to get an attorney first to make sure that you don't incriminate yourself. This is the most important thing. Even if you committed the crime and want to accept responsibility; do not go to the police until you retain an attorney. If they arrest you first, do not speak to them until your attorney is present regardless of any promises they make.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Rothstein Law PLLC
    Rothstein Law PLLC | Eric Rothstein
    No. You don't want the police getting a statement from you.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    The Law Offices of Jason Chan
    The Law Offices of Jason Chan | Jason Chan
    It would be better to go to the police with a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Office of Daniel J. Larin
    Law Office of Daniel J. Larin | Daniel Larin
    Never have any contact with the police until you have consulted a competent criminal lawyer. Also, you should never answer a police officers questions about a crime - even if you are innocent. Always demand the presence of a lawyer before answering any questions. It is your right - DEMAND IT.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Office of Kyle T. Green, PLLC
    Law Office of Kyle T. Green, PLLC | Kyle T. Green
    I never would recommend that somebody turn themselves in prior to getting an attorney. An attorney can help you make sure that your constitutional rights are protected and that you don't say something you shouldn't.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    No.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/11/2013
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    As an attorney, my answer is a resounding NO, but the choice is a very personal one. At the very least, almost any attorney would consult with someone for free on this subject. But hiring an attorney can be very helpful as far as negotiating terms of surrender, bail, and subsequent charges.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Kevin Smith, Attorney at Law
    Kevin Smith, Attorney at Law | Kevin Smith
    You have a duty to turn yourself in once you know of a warrant for your arrest, but you should call an attorney immediately as you have an absolute constitutional right to representation, even when turning yourself in. Moreover, cops will often try to interrogate you during the turn in process, and you have a right to have an attorney present during any questioning. Bottom line: call an experienced criminal defense attorney immediately if you even think there may be a warrant for your arrest.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 4/29/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    No. No. No. No. No.

    Talk to an attorney first. Scrape together a few hundred dollars for a consultation. Maybe the state will never proceed against you if you don't turn yourself in. Maybe your attorney can negotiate a better plea deal before you turn yourself in. Maybe your case will be dismissed on speedy-trial grounds. Talk to a lawyer.

    If you turn yourself in, or if you get arrested, do not talk to the police. If they ask you questions say "I don't want to talk. I want a lawyer." Repeat that until they stop asking. The police are good at persuading people to talk, and persuading people that it's in their best interest to talk. The police are not on your side, they are allowed to lie to you, and they want to put you in jail. Don't talk to them.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 4/29/2011
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