Should I speak with a nursing board investigator without a lawyer? 10 Answers as of April 19, 2011

An RN abused narcotics. She self referred to the nursing board and completed a 1 year program, but dropped out due to financial struggle. Now the investigator wants to interview me once again. No charges were filed.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
I would be very careful in doing so without a lawyer unless you know exactly what the investigator is going to recommend or what his marching orders are. By not completing the program the nursing board might be gearing up to resume the disciplinary hearing process which could result in loss of your license.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/19/2011
Law Offices of Ryan P. Murphy
Law Offices of Ryan P. Murphy | Ryan P. Murphy
Well, the answer depends upon whether you can be charged with anything and how well you know this person. If you did nothing wrong but want to protest your friend, that is a different question. I would have an attorney present if you are facing any charges or being reprimanded by the Board. Should you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact my office at your earliest convenience.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/7/2011
Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
The ONLY specific advice you can expect to get from here or elsewhere is to exercise your 5th Amendment rights to SHUT UP, and hire an attorney to speak for you. That applies in criminal charges, as well as administrative matters like yours where you face serious consequences such as license revocation. 95% of people convict themselves by trying to be 'helpful and cooperative'. Unless you know how to effectively represent yourself in this, hire an attorney who does. If this is in SoCAL, and youre serious about hiring counsel, feel free to contact me.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/7/2011
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
From the post, I cannot tell if the person referenced is you or some one else. I will respond as to both situations. The RN who abused should probably consult an attorney who has some knowledge about state licensing procedures and criminal law. Being under the influence is a crime, having narcotic w/o a prescription is a crime and admission to abuse can result in a search warrant which could lead to other unpleasant events. If you are the person involved, I would not participate in an interview w/o an attorney. If you are not the person involved, I would suggest you talk to an attorney depending on what your relationship is to the involved person.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/7/2011
Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
Absolutely no.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/7/2011
Click to View More Answers: