Should I sign a quit claim deed on a house after filing bankruptcy? How? 8 Answers as of September 14, 2015

I co-own a house with someone and I filed bankruptcy and was awarded a discharge. Should I sign a quit claim deed to other person?

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Ronald K. Nims LLC | Ronald K. Nims
Generally yes. There are liabilities inherent in owning a house, if you're no longer involved in it, the quit claim will eliminate your liability.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 9/14/2015
GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C.
GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C. | Richard N. Gonzales
I would be very careful. Pay an experienced BK lawyer to look at your BK petition and answer your questions.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 8/17/2015
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
Is your bankruptcy case closed? Did the trustee file a "no asset report"? The case may not be over just because you received a discharge. The trustee could still be claiming an interest in that property. If the trustee is trying to sell the property you better get a lawyer to look at the case. If your case is in fact "closed" - you can do whatever you want with it. A trip to the courthouse to look at the file might be in order.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/12/2015
A Fresh Start
A Fresh Start | Dorothy G Bunce
I have no way to know why you might want to do this.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/11/2015
Garner Law Office
Garner Law Office | Daniel Garner
You do not need permission from the bankruptcy court to transfer your interest in the house now that you have a discharge, unless the bankruptcy trustee claimed it during your case. Otherwise, it's totally your decision.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 8/11/2015
    Richard B. Jacobson & Associates, LLC | Richard B. Jacobson
    No one can answer your question without knowing a great deal more. E.g. Why do you want to sign a QCD to this person? Is it part of a relationship that might, like many others, go sour and you would find that you had gifted away something of value which you want back? Discuss this in detail with a lawyer whom you retain, or some other person in whom you have confidence.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 8/11/2015
    Mauritz Van Niekerk, Attorneys at Law
    Mauritz Van Niekerk, Attorneys at Law | Christiaan van Niekerk
    There is nothing that stops you from doing that.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/11/2015
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
    There are a lot of circumstances that can affect that but if you don't want the house then it may not hurt you to do.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/11/2015
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