Should I get a lawyer for my son if the officer is looking for him? 58 Answers as of June 10, 2013

The officer came by looking for my son. Do I call him back or get a lawyer. I’m not sure what it’s about.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Palumbo and Kosofsky
Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
Yes. Never allow yourself to be interviewed by the police without counsel. We can represent him.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 5/18/2011
Harris Law Firm
Harris Law Firm | Jennifer C. Robins
If you are concerned that law enforcement is investigating your son, you may hire an attorney to assist you with pre-investigation representation. That would ensure that your son's rights are protected. Contact attorneys in your area and ask what the retainer would be for pre-investigation or pre-indictment representation.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 5/17/2011
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
Yes. Do not speak to the police. You will not help your son by talking to police. Get counsel. Stay well.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 5/17/2011
Law Offices of John Carney
Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
You should never speak to the police or have your son speak to them. You should retain an experienced criminal attorney to investigate the matter and surrender him to the police id required so that no statements or admissions will be made to be used at trial.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 5/16/2011
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
Yes, definitely a good idea to have an attorney contact the officer to see what is going on if there is any chance he is investigating your son for a crime. Your son might have some idea "what it's about". If the officer contacts him first your son might make statements that will damage his legal position.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/16/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    I would get a lawyer if it was my son.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    First thing to do is discuss this with your son. I would guess that he has information why the officer is looking for him. Perhaps it is only that he may have been a witness to a crime. If you call the officer back, I doubt he will tell you why they are looking for your son. I would always suggest that you turn your son in with an attorney with him, especially if you learn from the kid or the cop that he is a person of interest in the commission of a crime.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    LynchLaw
    LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
    The Police are wonderful people, until you are the focus of their attention. Typically, if the Police are calling, it means they need additional information to allow the DA to file charges. Never call and provide that information. You should be able to find an attorney who will make the call for you on an hourly basis. Once the Police learn your son has "lawyered up" they will have to stop bothering him and it will be up to the DA to decide if they would like to file with the limited information they have at hand.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    If a person learns he is facing arrest and charges for a crime, What can you do? NOT run and hide. Hire an attorney, unless you know how to effectively represent yourself in court against a professional prosecutor intending to convict. No amount of free 'tips and hints' from here or anywhere else are going to effectively help you in your defense, other than the advice to exercise the 5th Amendment right to not talk to anyone except an attorney about the case. Most police and prosecutors will happily tell you that 95% of people convict themselves by trying to be 'helpful and cooperative', either during initial contact, questioning, interview or interrogation. If serious about hiring counsel to help you in this, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Judin & Rogers
    Judin & Rogers | Hank Judin
    Simple answer yes.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 6/10/2013
    The English Law Firm
    The English Law Firm | Robert English
    I would always recommend a lawyer in that case before speaking to the police.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    It really depends on why the office want to speak with him. I would never let my son speak with a cop! If he is going to be arrest then I get an attorney, if they just want to talk I tell him not to and that ends the conversation.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Subin
    Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
    If it were my son, I would get him a lawyer before he made any statements to the police.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman | Scott G. Hilderman
    You should have a lawyer. Anything you say can be used against your son. Anything your lawyer says can't be used against your son.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    Yes, you should hire an attorney to represent your son and to call the police to see what's going on and why they want him. Hire an experienced criminal defense lawyer and do not say anything to the police until the lawyer is on record with the police as being his attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
    Get a lawyer now. Youth are especially susceptible to giving statements to the police. Call, I have defended youth against criminal charges for nearly 30 years.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    You should hire an attorney ASAP. As a former prosecutor, I can tell you that most people made my case by "telling their side of the story." In law enforcement terms, that's what we call a confession. Your son should not even interact with the police if possible but definitely hire an attorney. I have 21years of experience including 18 years or more of criminal experience. Please feel free to give me a call. I have a lot of experience dealing with Law Enforcement.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Kelly A. Broadbent, Esq.
    Kelly A. Broadbent, Esq. | Kelly Broadbent
    It may be a good idea to hire counsel if the officer is looking to question your son with regard to a criminal matter. This way your son's rights are protected and he does not incriminate himself.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Sharifi & Baron
    Sharifi & Baron | S. Yossof Sharifi
    Absolutely! As soon as possible hire an attorney. No matter what statements he makes to the police, they will be used against him.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre | Jonathan T. Sarre
    That would be a very good idea. If the police are looking for your kid it's probably not a good thing so you should call an attorney and retain that attorney to communicate with the police regarding this matter. The lawyer should be able to find out what's going on and if necessary arrange an interview with the officer or potentially negotiate your son's surrender to law enforcement (hopefully he's not in that much trouble). Whatever you do, don't allow your son to speak to the police without representation.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Law Office of Michael Moody
    Law Office of Michael Moody | Michael Moody
    If police are looking to ask your son questions, he needs a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    If the cop did not say he thought your son was a victim or just a witness, get son an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    You should speak to an attorney in your area before speaking to the police. It is very important to be aware of your rights and the potential outcomes of speaking with a police officer. After speaking to/hiring an attorney you will be advised of how best to proceed.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    You could call the police precinct to try to find out why they are looking for your son. It could be he is a suspect or it could be he is a witness to a crime or something else. You should probably talk to your son about it. if your son is not forthcoming or does not really know why they are looking for him, you could contact an attorney now or perhaps wait and see if your son is charged with any crime and then hire an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    It would make a great difference depending upon the reason the officer wants to speak to your son. If he is a suspect in a crime, you may wish to consult with an attorney first. If he is a witness to a crime, he probably will not need counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Allan & Summary
    Allan & Summary | Justin Summary
    Definitely talk to a lawyer about the situation first.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    I have no idea why the police are looking for your son. I always suggest being polite and returning the call, but do not say anything. Simply state you are returning the call and ask why they are looking for your son? If your son is under 17 he will be treated as a juvenile if 17 or older as an adult. The best advice I give is do not talk. There is almost nothing that you or your son can say that will help his situation, so don't talk so he can walk. If son is being charged criminally, he should agree to turn himself in remain silent and assert his right to an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    There are two parts to this: protecting him and protecting you. If you have no knowledge of criminal activity on his part, then you're safe. By contacting the detective yourself, you potentially put yourself in a position of knowing too much. Stay out of that position. Don't try to lie or cover for him. For your son - use, he should speak to an attorney before talking to the police. I don't know why they're looking for him, but the odds are it's not good. For the reasons why he shouldn't talk to them without a lawyer, see an article I wrote on my website.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    Any person accused of a crime has the right to an attorney. Generally, getting an attorney involved early in the process is better than waiting. An attorney can advise your son on what course of action he should take to protect his rights.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    Perhaps you wish you had simply asked the officer. Yes, you could retain an attorney to investigate this matter. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    The Law Offices of Mark Kotlarsky
    The Law Offices of Mark Kotlarsky | Mark Kotlarsky
    Yes. The lawyer can talk to the police and make arrangements for bail beforehand.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Ron Graham Attorney at Law
    Ron Graham Attorney at Law | Ron Graham
    You should retain counsel if you do not know what is about.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann | Christopher J. McCann
    Always get a lawyer. You never know what might happen if they find your son first. The lawyer can find out why they want him and avoid a dangerous confrontation. He'll also advise your son how to avoid giving a statement.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    It is always best to get an attorney and have him go in with your son.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    It's your choice. It would probably be easiest to speak to the officer initially just to find out what it's about. Once you know what's going on, you can hire an attorney to accompany your son during any interviews or to negotiate with the police directly. I would not recommend letting your son talk to the police alone; anything he says can and will be used against him. Feel free to call our office if you would like to discuss the matter in more detail.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Law Offices of Carl Spector
    Law Offices of Carl Spector | Carl Spector
    You should contact a criminal defense attorney. Then give the attorney the contact information to the police officer for the attorney to call and speak to the officer. The attorney can find out the nature of the inquiry and then advise your son as to his best options. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    It would probably be best to consult a lawyer about this. If you call the cops, the officer may elicit damaging information from you without you knowing it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Your son should consult a lawyer before speaking with an officer and incriminating himself. The best rule to follow is, always remain silent. Easier said than done if you don't have a lawyer beside you advising you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    Get a lawyer to call the cops back. If they do reach do not lie. You can refuse to talk to them which is not a crime but lying to them Is.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
    Get a lawyer to find out what is going on.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Great question! He needs a lawyer on board ASAP. Never speak to the police unrepresented. Contact me to discuss in detail.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    It depends. Is the officer looking for him because he's a suspect or a witness? If your son is charged with anything, then you definitely need to retain a lawyer for him. Otherwise, a lawyer isn't really needed, but it may make you feel better about the process and a lawyer would be more apt to explain what is going on, what to do (should he or should he not talk to the police). If it's worth the money to give you and your son a peace of mind, then I'd say retain a lawyer. Otherwise, I don't necessarily think it's absolutely crucial at this point.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady | Kevin O'Grady
    Whenever the police are "looking" for someone, and the person being sought did not initiate the call as the victim of a crime or to request police assistance there is the real possibility that the police want to interrogate or arrest the person being sought. It is usually best and doesn't hurt to hire a private criminal defense attorney as soon as something like that happens.
    Answer Applies to: Hawaii
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts | Andrew Stephen Roberts
    Yes. Your son should have representation if he is being investigated. He should not say anything unless he has an attorney with him.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law | Edward A. Kroll
    Yes. Absolutely have a lawyer present if your son speaks to the police. If you don't know what this is about, there is NO reason to expose your son to potential criminal liability.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O.
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O. | Eric R. Chandler
    First, I would talk to your son; but it's always a good idea to speak to a lawyer before meeting with law enforcement.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman | Gabriel Dorman
    You should absolutely call a lawyer for your son. Anytime the police are looking to speak with you (or your son) you should immediately contact and hire a lawyer to represent you. Anything your son says can be used against him. However, anything your son's lawyer says on his behalf cannot be used against him. The lawyer will contact the police and indicate that your son is represented by an attorney and any further communications should be directed toward the lawyer. Protect your son and hire a lawyer for him. I hope this answer was helpful. If you would like to speak with me in more detail, I would be happy to do so. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Alanna D. Coopersmith, Attorney at Law
    Alanna D. Coopersmith, Attorney at Law | Alanna D. Coopersmith
    Your son should tell the officer that he does not want to answer any questions without a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    California Criminal Defense Center
    California Criminal Defense Center | Ardalon Fakhimi
    Without a doubt, you should consult a lawyer before speaking to law enforcement.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    Yes, you should seek legal counsel for your son. At this point, there presumably is a warrant for his arrest. It is far better to arrange to present him on the warrant that to have him picked up by the police. With an attorney, the attorney can contact the police/officer in charge and arrange when to bring him in and perhaps even arrange to have a personal bond recommended. Definitely, there should be no agreement to make a statement, no interview without a lawyer, and no questioning of your son. I look forward to hearing from you to arrange an appointment to meet and discuss this case.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    Get a lawyer. Don't call the police officer back. Your son absolutely should not talk to the police without talking to a lawyer first, and probably not then. If the police contact your son, he should say "I don't want to talk. I want a lawyer" until they stop asking questions. It is possible that they will arrest him, but if they have enough evidence to arrest him, then nothing he says will make it better.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Bruce H. Lehr, P.A.
    Bruce H. Lehr, P.A. | Bruce H. Lehr
    Get a lawyer so your son's rights will be protected.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 5/13/2011
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney