Is it possible for me to file an immigration papers for my wife by myself? 14 Answers as of June 19, 2013

Me and my wife have been married for three years and have children together. Can I file her immigration papers by myself?

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Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny
Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny | Svetlana Boukhny
Yes, if you know what you need to do and feel confidently enough to do it on your own, you can do it on your own.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/27/2012
Bell, Nunnally & Martin, LLP | Karen-Lee Pollak
You can file for your wife. However; you may need a joint sponsor to co sponsor the Affidavit of Support if you earn below a certain amount. Feel free to call us to discuss your case.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 2/27/2012
Law Office of Christine Troy
Law Office of Christine Troy | Christine Troy
Some people do file on their own. I do not recommend it as it can lead to unintended violations, delays or mistakes. A good first step is to have an initial consult with a competent immigration attorney in your region to review the facts of her case.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/27/2012
Philip M. Zyne, P.A.
Philip M. Zyne, P.A. | Philip M. Zyne
You do not state how your wife entered the US and whether she has any immigration or criminal problems. You will need to provide that information before a proper answer can be given.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 6/19/2013
The Law Offices of Kristy Qiu
The Law Offices of Kristy Qiu | Mengjun Qiu
If you mean yourself without her, no, she will also need to file paperwork for herself. if you mean without a lawyer, yes absolutely. However, if her current immigration status is illegal you will need to seek a waiver first, and waivers often get tricky. If that is the case, I highly recommend that you seek help of a lawyer.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 2/27/2012
    Theresa E. Tilton, Attorney at Law
    Theresa E. Tilton, Attorney at Law | Theresa E. Tilton
    Yes, you can. It is not an easy process, though. You will find that hiring an experienced lawyer will help you to get things right the first time. Your family's future is at risk. If you are not a doctor, and if your wife were very ill, would you perform surgery on her by yourself? It's the same with any legal operation.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 2/27/2012
    Ayodele M. Ojo & Associates
    Ayodele M. Ojo & Associates | Ayodele Mayowa Ojo
    Yes you can. Though the fact you provided is not enough to know how your wife got to US or if she is still abroad.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 2/27/2012
    World Esquire Law Firm
    World Esquire Law Firm | Aime Katambwe
    You can do whatever you want but if filing and receiving LPR status for her is important to you both, I recommend you use competent counsel. If you know what you are doing however and you are confident that you got this in the bag, then by all means proceed with it. If you do not know anything about immigration laws, please help yourself and use an attorney. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/27/2012
    Fong & Associates
    Fong & Associates | William D. Fong
    Based on the information provided in your post, I assume you are not familiar with US immigration laws and would advise strongly that you hire an immigration attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 2/27/2012
    Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C.
    Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C. | David Nabow Soloway
    If you are asking whether you and your wife may file a marriage-based adjustment of status application package by yourself and without engaging an immigration attorney, the simple answer is "yes." Engagement of an immigration law firm would be wise, however, if you and your wife are not very clear about all of the legal requirements and documentary evidence that will be required, and this is especially true if there may be any details that create complications (such as uncertainty about birth documents, previous divorce records, a history involving a criminal arrest, etc.). The adjustment of status process can be significantly more complex than it appears, with risks of delay, denial and other consequences for the unwary. Aside from the relatively obvious advantages of being represented by a lawyer to assure that the case is prepared and pursued properly, there are other advantages too, and these include having USCIS send notices to two addresses (yours and the attorney's), having an attorney attend an adjustment of status interview with the couple to assure that the USCIS adjudicating officer focuses only on legally relevant matters, and having access to the liaison process between the American Immigration Lawyers Association and the USCIS (especially useful where the USCIS makes a mistake or presents an unusual delay).
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 2/27/2012
    All American Immigration
    All American Immigration | Tom Youngjohn
    Yes you can file by yourself. But what if she came in illegal? What if she has a criminal record? What if you don't make enough money to sponsor her? You should at least call a couple of immigration lawyers who give free phone consultation and compare their responses. Seriously.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/2/2013
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal | Alexander Segal
    You can file immigration papers for your wife without an attorney. However, it is important to make sure your wife is eligible to receive a green card before taking such steps. It is also important that you follow the instructions for the forms carefully as if the forms are not complete, they can be rejected or additional documents will be needed.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 2/27/2012
    Law Offices of Caro Kinsella
    Law Offices of Caro Kinsella | Caro Kinsella, Esq.
    Yes but it is advisable to retain an Immigration attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/2/2013
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