My daughter that I paid child support for is pregnant, will this affect my child support payments? 26 Answers as of July 04, 2013

If she is having her own kid, do I still need to pay child support? She is 17.

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Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law
Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law | Gregory T. Buckley
While a pregnant minor is considered to be medically emancipated, you are still responsible for child support payments until the age of 18.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 7/13/2011
Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Paul Wallin
You have to continue to pay child support until you are 18 years old whether or not your daughter is pregnant with her own child.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/4/2013
Neville J. Bedford Attorney at Law
Neville J. Bedford Attorney at Law | Neville J. Bedford
Unless she is married , or otherwise emancipated - your child support obligation for your daughter will probably continue depending on your particular state law.
Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
Replied: 7/4/2013
Willick Law Group
Willick Law Group | Marshal S. Willick
Her pregnancy does not affect your child support obligation, which runs through 18, or 19 if she is still in high school.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 7/4/2013
Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
You are under a court order, the order states you pay support until your daughter is 18 (until she graduates if she is attending high school) unless she is emancipated and the decree spells out the items that make her emancipated. Now the trick is this, the listed items terminated child support automatically, any other emancipating event requires court intervention. The short version is that her having a child of her own is an emancipating event, but you have to look at your custody and support papers. The Orders of the Court will tell you what events are automatic. Does it state a blanket "or any other event which declares or causes the child to be emancipated" or some similar language? If so, this may be an automatic triggering event - you really need to spend $50-$100 for a little face time with a lawyer who does this just in case. Now, if there is no blanket provision in your orders (it would actually be rare to have one) you have to get the Court to declare her emancipated, which the law will support your claim so unless the Judge left his law degree at home, you win. Just file a motion to modify and terminate - it is fairly inexpensive. Keep in mind, the emancipating event is the birth of your grandchild and you do not want to alienate her at this point - that is your grandchild and I am certain you want to see him or her so while the law will let you terminate support being paid to your ex you would be well advised to consider the needs of your daughter who will need stuff for your grandchild when you proceed. FYI: for obvious reason, even though giving birth is an emancipating event, it is not an item listed in decrees as automatic termination events so I can tell you it is not listed that way.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 7/8/2011
    Seattle Divorce Services
    Seattle Divorce Services | Michael V. Fancher
    Your daughter's pregnancy should not affect anything. You owe support for as long as the support order says that you owe support.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/8/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    No. The child's pregnancy will not impact your child support payments.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 7/4/2013
    Pontrello Law
    Pontrello Law | William Pontrello
    If she formally gets emancipated before your obligation ends.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/4/2013
    Osterman Law LLC
    Osterman Law LLC | Mark D. Osterman
    The quick answer based on these facts is: Yes. The idea of emancipation deals with whether your daughter intends to become an adult before the law requires her to be an adult. The acts of being an adult include getting married, living on her own without support from her mother or others. Acts of emancipation include a permanent job, no longer attending school, and means not only doing "adult" things, but also not doing things one would expect of a child.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 7/7/2011
    Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
    Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
    Yes. The fact that your daughter is pregnant and will give birth does not reduce or eliminate your child support obligation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/7/2011
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A.
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A. | Michael D. Fluke
    The fact that your daughter is having a child does not affect your child support obligation unless she moves out from the other parent.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/7/2011
    Law Office of James Lentz
    Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
    You still need to pay child support and any court ordered contribution toward any arrearage.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 7/4/2013
    Law Office of Xochitl Anita Quezada
    Law Office of Xochitl Anita Quezada | Xochitl Anita Quezada
    You still need to pay child support unless she is emancipated. If she turns 18 and is no longer in high school then you can also stop paying.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller | Jody A. Miller
    Most likely yes, you will have to pay child support, unless she is completely out on her own and self-supporting.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    ROWE LAW FIRM
    ROWE LAW FIRM | Jeffrey S. Wittenbrink
    Unless your daughter has been judicially emancipated you are still liable for her support, as long as she is dependent upon the mother. If she is not living with the mother you should seek modification of the support-you may still owe it to the daughter until she is 18, or 19 if she is in High School and not graduated.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    Glenn E. Tanner
    Glenn E. Tanner | Glenn E. Tanner
    If there is still a child support order in place, it terminates when it says it terminates. I doubt it says it terminates when she gets pregnant.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    Law Office of Michael W. Bugni
    Law Office of Michael W. Bugni | Jay W. Neff
    I assume that there is a child support order in place. Typically, child support continues until either child support terminates pursuant to the terms of the child support order or until the court changes the order. Most child support orders say that child support continues until the child is either 18 years old or graduates from high school, whichever happens last, unless the court orders post-secondary support. Therefore, as a starting point, my reaction is that the mere fact that your 17 year old is pregnant probably won't affect child support, and, therefore, it must be paid. However, I can also imagine situations in which it might. For example, it is conceivable that the pregnancy could create uninsured medical bills that you might end up having to pay a portion of. Another example: I suppose that if the child is living with her boyfriend, outside of the family home, and if the boyfriend is supporting her, it might be possible to convince a court to terminate child support immediately. There is also the issue of whether it makes economic sense to do anything about the child support. You did not say how close to the age 18 the child is, nor how close she is to being out of high school. You also didn't say how much child support is a month. If there is only a few months of child support left, you might end up saving money by just going ahead and paying support rather than fighting the issue through the court system.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law | John Kirchner
    The fact that she is having a child does not, by itself, indicate that your daughter is emancipated and until she is emancipated you are liable for child support. Unless she gets married, joins the armed forces, or becomes financially self-sufficient, she will not be emancipated until she is 19.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler
    Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler | Robert L Fiedler
    Unfortunately, you will be a parent supporting a child who will be supporting a child.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 7/4/2013
    The Law Office of David J. Brown
    The Law Office of David J. Brown | David Brown
    The answer to your question really will depend on your particular circumstances. The best advice I can give is that you talk to an attorney and discuss all the relevant details with that attorney. Generally speaking, your child support obligation would not change simply because your child became a parent. Again, generally, your obligation to pay support would continue until the child turns 18 or graduates from high school, whichever event occurs last. There are some factors that come in to play for determining support for an 18-year-old child still in high school, but none are relevant to this discussion. If your child becomes emancipated, an act that generally requires a court order, then your obligation to pay support could end. Also, if your child married, then she could also be considered emancipated and your support obligation could end. But, simply having a child of her own will not result in emancipation; thus, your obligation to pay support would continue.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    Wolverine Law | Stuart Collis
    You still need to pay child support until she graduates high school or 18, whichever is later or turns 19.5 if she has not graduated high school.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP | Christine Gonilla
    Support is payable for a child until that child is 18 unless the child is living with a parent and is a full time high school student then it is until graduation from high school or age 19 whichever first occurs. The information contained in this email may be confidential and/or legally privileged. It has been sent for the sole use of the intended recipient(s). If the reader of this message is not an intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any unauthorized review, use, disclosure, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication, or any of its contents, is strictly prohibited.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    Until she is at least 18 you do unless your court order contains a different age.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/4/2013
    Beresford Booth PLLC
    Beresford Booth PLLC | S. Scott Burkhalter
    You will need to pay child support until your support obligation terminates, as set forth in your order of child support. Typically, it is the latter of when she turns 18 or graduates from high school.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law
    William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law | William C. Gosnell
    You must pay child support until she is 18 or her high school class graduates, whichever occurs last, except if she is emancipated. Does she live with your ex or on her own or with a boyfriend or husband? Does she work and support herself?
    Answer Applies to: Tennessee
    Replied: 7/6/2011
    Dunnings Law Firm
    Dunnings Law Firm | Steven Dunnings
    Her pregnancy has no bearing on your support obligation unless so provided in the Judgment of divorce.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/4/2013
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