My creditor knows my BK was discharged, but is sending multiple threatening letters anyway, should I act or ignore? 7 Answers as of August 18, 2015

I received a bankruptcy chapter 7 discharge late last year. In the last month, I've received two letters from a collection agency on behalf of one of the creditors listed in the bankruptcy. That debt is being shown as discharged, just like the others. I called the number on the letters, gave the bk case information, left detailed contact information to contact the attorney I used, but I myself haven't heard back from the attorney. I sent him multiple emails with copies of the letters. I think he's ignoring me because he case ended so long ago. I don't see how this creditor is so different from the others. In any case, I've read that this kind of thing is not allowed. My question is: should I just ignore it, or should I act? If I should act, what should my first step be? Thanks so much for your time.

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Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
You should act. Send them a copy of the discharge. If they still continue to contact you file a motion for contempt.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/18/2015
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
You could have an attorney file a FDCPA violation or reopen your bankruptcy case and file for a discharge violation. Either way you should get damages and legal fees paid.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 8/18/2015
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
Get a new lawyer. This is a discharge violation and a smart lawyer would pursue it.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/18/2015
A Fresh Start
A Fresh Start | Dorothy G Bunce
Somehow I suspect that there is more to this story than you are letting on because creditors just do not engage in these kinds of activities without there being some exceptions. If this creditor financed the purchase of property, whether it was a TV set, jewelry, or home repairs, it may have a lien under the UCC that allows the creditor to repossess the property unless you pay. And since most people would want some kind of warning before having their A/C ripped out in 110 degree heat, you might want to consider making a deal with this creditor in order to keep the property. The other scenario is the creditor who is a former friend or a family member. They are doing this because they do not know any better, and a sharply worded letter from your attorney might be enough to chase them away.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/18/2015
Mauritz Van Niekerk, Attorneys at Law
Mauritz Van Niekerk, Attorneys at Law | Christiaan van Niekerk
Get in touch with your lawyer the creditor should not be doing that.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 8/18/2015
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