Must one enter a plea at arraignment? 5 Answers as of November 03, 2014

I appeared at my criminal arraignment, the courtroom was very chaotic, when myself and co-defendant went in front of judge, neither one of us was asked how we plea or even read our charges. When our case was bound over to Superior Court, at my arraignment in Superior Court the judge said I needed to RE-ENTER my plea. I had not entered a plea so far, so how could I be re-entering a plea? At the first arraignment, the judge was very busy and confused, and may have overlooked asking for my plea, I am not sure. Is it the law to enter your plea at the arraignment?

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
The judge more than likely entered a plea of not guilty for you at your first arraignment. I am assuming that you are being charged with a felony and have already had a preliminary hearing where you were bound over. At the second arraignment, you must again enter a plea. If you have not hired an attorney and do not have a public defender, it's time to get one. If you do have an attorney, you should be asking your attorney about this.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/3/2014
Law Office of Jeff Yeh
Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
Not necessarily. You can postpone/continue the arraignment.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/23/2014
Hammerschmidt Broughton Law
Hammerschmidt Broughton Law | Mark A. Broughton
Yes. The record will show you entered a Not Guilty plea at your initial arraignment (your lawyer may have done it), and the second after the prelim. So, you entered a plea in the lower court to the charges alleged in the Complaint, and then to the "official charges" contained in the Information.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/23/2014
Attorney at Law
Attorney at Law | Michael J. Kennedy
To be bound over, you needed to have had a preliminary hearing, which is long after your initial arraignment, where the judge must have entered a not guilty plea for you. I am concerned about the quality of your representation by counsel if you have to ask those questions here. Sounds like you need different counsel.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/23/2014
Law Office of Edward J. Blum
Law Office of Edward J. Blum | Edward J. Blum
Yes. Guilty or preferably not guilty.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/23/2014
Click to View More Answers: