Legally living and working in USA 10 Answers as of December 30, 2010

My friend from Moldova is in the US on a B2 visa, she would like to move here (Commonwealth of Massachusetts) to live and work legally. Is this possible without 1: marrying a US citizen 2: being offered a job by a company willing to sponsor her for a work visa? She wants to have an honest life and does not want to circumvent the laws.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Pacifica Legal Services
Pacifica Legal Services | Floyd Fernandez
The only other alternatives are: 1) obtaining admission into an American university or college and obtain an F-1 student visa or J-1 scholar's visa; 2) obtain an E-5 visa with her own business; 3) if she has immediate family already here to sponsor her (spouse or parents who are U.S. citizens or legal residents). If she would like to discuss the matter further (and she has English proficiency), she is free to call or e-mail me to set up an in-person or phone consultation. Best to you, and her.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 12/30/2010
441 Legal Group, Inc.
441 Legal Group, Inc. | Gareth H. Bullock
If she has already overstayed her authorized time then no. However if she is still in status she could contemplate self petitioning by starting a business.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 12/14/2010
William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law
William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law | William C. Gosnell
B-2 visa is a tourist visa.

She can apply for a quota visa from her country but there are waiting lists.

She could apply for a work visa for a company. If wealth she could apply for an

investor visa. Otherwise she should marry an American.
Answer Applies to: Tennessee
Replied: 12/10/2010
Fletcher, Tilton & Whipple, PC
Fletcher, Tilton & Whipple, PC | Kirk A. Carter
Yes, if she has $500,000 or more to invest in an EB-5 investor visa program, has a USC child over the age of 21, has a well-founded fear of returning to Moldova that would form the basis of a claim for asylum, qualifies as an extraordinary ability alien and is able to self-petition, or won the visa lottery last year, she may be able to accomplish what she wants, but her best bet is to seek a consultation with a qualified immigration attorney to fully explore her options. Most immigration attorneys such as myself charge $100 for a one hour consultation. Some charge nothing, but you usually get what you pay for!
Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
Replied: 12/10/2010
Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny
Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny | Svetlana Boukhny
No, it is not possible to just live in the US unless one has a status and in order to get status, it must be either through an employment based visa or a family-based visa.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 12/10/2010
    Marie Michaud Attorney At Law
    Marie Michaud Attorney At Law | Marie Michaud
    The only thing I can think of is the Green card lottery. As a general rule, you either need a relative to file for you or an employer to sponsor you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2010
    Law Office of Michael E. Hendrickson
    Law Office of Michael E. Hendrickson | Michael E. Hendrickson
    Yes, become an E-2 visa investor, able, willing and with the necessary funds to establish and operate a business in the United States.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 12/9/2010
    JCS Immigration & Visa Law Office
    JCS Immigration & Visa Law Office | Jack C. Sung
    1. Marry a US citizen will entitle her to live and work legally here in the United States. I can help her obtain permanent resident status.

    2. Being offered a job by a company can also work for a work visa. However, it must be a professional position and she must have a B.A. or B.S. degree.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2010
    Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law
    Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law | Linda Liang
    With a B2 visa, the intent of your friend had to be non-immigrant. Except the two options you mentioned, other choice would be NIW, asylum, religious workers..E1 visa...etc. She is more than welcome to call us with her specific background so that we can advise on efficient strategy.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 12/9/2010
    Law Offices of Daniel Richardson
    Law Offices of Daniel Richardson | Daniel R. Richardson
    She either needs a work visa or a family-based visa. For the latter, she would have to be petitioned by a close relative who is a citizen or green card holder.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2010
Click to View More Answers: