Is a written nonnotarized document signing property to a beneficiary of your living trust legal if you were heavily sedated? 4 Answers as of August 14, 2015

My brother took a hand written piece paper onto hospital, had my mom sign it, giving him a valuable property that in her living trust. She was on her death bed. When she passed, the attorney gave me no details, refused to produce document until a year later when I threatened to all the DA. The only thing he said is that it was a fond deal and refused to tell me the date or any details. Later, I got the document and a copy of her medical records too. Mother was intubated and heavily sedated on the date she signed the document.


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Law Ofices of Edwin K. Niles | Edwin K. Niles
Probably not. Of course there will be a dispute about the facts.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/14/2015
Law Office of Jeffrey T. Reed | Jeffrey T. Reed
It's probably not binding, I would need to know more, but you really need to see an attorney to help you with this.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/14/2015
Law Office of Nathan Wagner
Law Office of Nathan Wagner | Nathan J. Wagner
You should talk to a local probate attorney right away. It sounds like your mother did not have capacity to sign the document, so the transfer could be invalid. Depending on what property was transferred, the failure to get the document notarized is probably not an issue.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/13/2015
Law Office Of Victor Waid
Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
Do two things. Report the attorney to the State Bar of California and your sibling to the District Attorney for embezzlement/fraud.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/13/2015
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