Is there any way she can get her $15,000 debt cleared if she does not have the income to pay? 25 Answers as of November 05, 2013

I have a 20 year old female friend, who is residing with me. She is currently working 2 jobs but is on her own. She makes only $8 an hour at each one. I cannot afford to help since I have a family of my own. I would appreciate some feedback.

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Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
A ch7 is a possibility. She should look into that.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/5/2013
Law Offices of Peter De Bruyn
Law Offices of Peter De Bruyn | Peter De Bruyn
She can file a chapter 7 bankruptcy.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/5/2013
Benson Law Firm
Benson Law Firm | David Benson
Chapter 7 bankruptcy is designed to allow below median income earners to discharge fully most, if not all, debt in exchange for liquidation of their nonexempt assets (which in most cases leaves debtors with everything they currently own).
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 11/4/2013
Philip R. Boardman, Attorney at Law
Philip R. Boardman, Attorney at Law | Phil Boardman
She should definitely consider Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.
Answer Applies to: Virginia
Replied: 10/31/2013
Timothy Casey Theisen, P.A. | Tim Theisen
Sounds like a chapter 7 bankruptcy would be her best bet.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 10/31/2013
    Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis
    Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis | Todd Mannis
    Either she has incredible negotiating skill and powers of persuasion, or bankruptcy. Can't hurt to try the first option, but unfortunately, I wouldn't hold my breath.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Law Offices of Daniel J Winter
    Law Offices of Daniel J Winter | Daniel J Winter
    She should speak with a bankruptcy lawyer to discuss her options. If it is right for her, she could eliminate the debt. This is only general advise, and the attorney would have to review her situation to see if she qualifies.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Paul Stuber, Attorney at Law
    Paul Stuber, Attorney at Law | Paul Stuber
    She might want to look into filing a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. I can't tell from what you have said if it would be best for her, but she might want to talk to an attorney to see.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Edelman, Combs, Latturner & Goodwin, LLC | Daniel A. Edelman
    Only through bankruptcy or negotiating something with the creditor.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Michael B. McFarland, P.A. | Michael B. McFarland
    Generally, the way to get rid of debt if she can't pay would be to enter into a settlement with the creditor(s) for a reduced amount, or file a bankruptcy (either chapter 7 or chapter 13, depending on a number of factors). Since she is working, there is a risk that (without a settlement of bankruptcy) a creditor could file suit, obtain a judgment and garnish a portion of her wages. Another possibility, if the debt(s) are old enough, and there have been no payments for a long time, collection could be barred by the statute of limitations. She should consult with an experienced bankruptcy attorney to learn more about her options - before making any settlement or making any more payments.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Danville Law Group | Scott Jordan
    Bankruptcy is possibly an option.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Marjorie Guymon
    She can file bankruptcy and discharge this debt.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    SM Law Group, APC
    SM Law Group, APC | John D. Sarai
    Her best and fastest way to clear the debt is to file a bankruptcy. That will discharge the debt and get her a fresh start.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    A Fresh Start
    A Fresh Start | Dorothy G Bunce
    There could be many ways to resolve debt issues. Details matter. Is the debt a student loan? Is it child support, aliomony, or taxes? Is it one debt or an accumulation of several obligations.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Elkington Law
    Elkington Law | Sally Elkington
    Your friend should see an attorney about filing a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. If her income is as low as you indicate she may qualify for Chapter 7. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy will discharge all of her dischargeable debts.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
    A chapter 7 bankruptcy will wipe out all of the debt and give her a fresh start on credit.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    SmithMarco, P.C.
    SmithMarco, P.C. | Larry P. Smith
    Perhaps she can. And perhaps it can be done without filing bankruptcy. Call me to discuss and I can provide a few options. No charge for the call.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Deborah F Bowinski, Attorney & Counselor at Law | Debby Bowinski
    Most debts are dischargeable in bankruptcy. She should schedule a consultation with a bankruptcy lawyer to see if that is the right solution for her.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Stuart P Gelberg
    Stuart P Gelberg | Stuart P Gelberg
    Inability to pay is not a reason to have your debt "cleared" (whatever you mean by that). She may be uncollectible but that does not stop her creditors from suing her and then seizing bank accounts, trying to garnish her wages, etc. Why doesn't she consider bkry? She may qualify for a pro bono atty. Have her call the local bar assn for a referral.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Charles Schneider, P.C.
    Charles Schneider, P.C. | Charles J. Schneider
    Yes we have bankruptcy law.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    The Law Offices of Deborah Ann Stencel | Deborah A. Stencel
    It depends on what kind of debt you are asking about. If the debt is ordinary credit cards and medical bills; then yes, it is possible to clear those via bankruptcy if she does not have the ability to pay.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Law Office of J. Thomas Black, P.C.
    Law Office of J. Thomas Black, P.C. | J. Thomas Black
    Yes, if her $15,000 in debt is ordinary unsecured debts like credit card debt, medical bills or payday loans, then yes she would likely qualify to file a bankruptcy case and discharge the debt. If the debt is student loans, taxes or child support, it would likely not be discharged in bankruptcy ; she should consult with an experienced bankruptcy attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Law Office of Lynnmarie A. Johnson
    Law Office of Lynnmarie A. Johnson | Lynnmarie Johnson
    Depending on the type of debt it is, she may be able to go bankrupt on it. Have her call Legal Services in your area and see if they will consider taking her case. Otherwise she may be able to negotiate some kind of very low payment.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/31/2013
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