Is there any way I can apply for bankruptcy if I am on disability Social Security and I have Medicare? 16 Answers as of February 13, 2015

I have a lot of credit cards and loans and everything. I've been trying to pay but I can't. I would appreciate it. If there’s still some place I can go to have my wages of fee waiver or polo bolo to would appreciate that. Thank you.

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Ronald K. Nims LLC | Ronald K. Nims
You can file bankruptcy if you're on social security disability.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 2/13/2015
Eranthe Law Firm
Eranthe Law Firm | Cate Eranthe
If pro bono services are available depends where you live. Go to the court website and look it up. Here is a link for the Northern District: http://www.canb.uscourts.gov/Pro_Se_Pro_Bono_Services
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/12/2015
GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C.
GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C. | Richard N. Gonzales
You are "judgment proof". In other words, even if creditors get a judgment against you, there is no way they can collect on that judgment. You don't own real estate, and there are no wages to garnish. I would suggest you call each creditor and tell them your situation, and ask them to please "charge off" the loan. Again, even if they don't charge off the loan as "non-collectible", there is no way for the creditor to collect on the debt. You have nothing to worry about.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 2/12/2015
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
Call the local bar association for your county and they should be able to guide you properly.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 2/12/2015
The Law Office of M Grater LLC
The Law Office of M Grater LLC | Mark O. Grater
Of course you can still apply for bankruptcy if you are on SSD.
Answer Applies to: Connecticut
Replied: 2/12/2015
    Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
    Yes you can.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 2/12/2015
    Law Office of Andrew Oostdyk
    Law Office of Andrew Oostdyk | Andrew Oostdyk
    If your only income is Social Security Disability, then you likely qualify for a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy. Contact a local Bankruptcy Attorney who offers free consultations, to determine what options you may have available. If you have been making minimum monthly payments on your credit cards, it may be best to use those payments towards a bankruptcy filing instead.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 2/12/2015
    John W. Lee, P.C.
    John W. Lee, P.C. | John W. Lee
    People that receive social security benefits and/or medicare can, and often do, file for bankruptcy. Most attorneys offer a free initial consultation and payment plans for low income debtors. In many cases, a person whose only source of income is social security could be considered "Judgment Proof." If you are Judgement Proof, then you may not even need a bankruptcy. You should contact an experienced local bankruptcy attorney for a free consultation to help you make this decision.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 2/12/2015
    Garner Law Office
    Garner Law Office | Daniel Garner
    Contact legal aid and you can probably get a bankruptcy done pro bono. Each county has a legal aid chapter. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 2/12/2015
    Richard B. Jacobson & Associates, LLC | Richard B. Jacobson
    Your source of income is irrelevant to your filing a bankruptcy petition. Same for medicare. I don't know what polo bolo means, so I can?t help with that. Check with the clerk of your district?s federal bankruptcy court to see if you can have the fee waived, or perhaps paid in installments. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 2/12/2015
    John W. Lee, PC
    John W. Lee, PC | Kim A. Lewis
    Yes you can file for bankruptcy with only social security income. If you represent yourself you may also file a motion to waive the filing fee.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 2/11/2015
    Thomas Vogele & Associates, APC | Thomas A. Vogele
    If your income is limited to Social Security disability, you don't need to file bankruptcy because California law prohibits levying on benefits such as this. If you have other income, or significant assets that might be seized to pay your debts, the situation might be different. You need to make an appointment with a bankruptcy lawyer and discuss your situation. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/11/2015
    Brooks Law Firm
    Brooks Law Firm | Ray Brooks
    Of course you can file for Bankruptcy. Your benefits would not be effected on Social Security should not be affected by a bankruptcy. They are exempt from assets that can be seized by creditors.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 2/11/2015
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
    You have wages and are on SSI? That seems odd to me. I think you are asking for a free bankruptcy. People like to ask for that all the time. However, working for a living is what we lawyers do. When you walk into the office someone has to pay the rent, buy the supplies, pay the insurance and the staff. All of that before I feed my dogs and the rest of my living expenses. I am amazed that people think we should work for free. Some courts however have a "pro bono" clinic. Check the local court web site.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/11/2015
    EDWARD P RUSSELL | EDWARD P RUSSELL
    There places you could go for pro bono work by attorneys. Volunteer Lawyers Network can help in Minnesota if you qualify by being in immediate danger of losing money which it seems you are.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 2/11/2015
    Danville Law Group | Scott Jordan
    Yes, you can file bankruptcy. You can also apply for fee waiver as well. All of the forms you need are available online. Alternatively, you may able to find a local bankruptcy attorney who is willing to file pro bono or a reduced fee.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/11/2015
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