Is the person responsible for a nursing home resident bill after they give up the Power of Attorney? 7 Answers as of February 21, 2014

My dad is a nursing home resident. My sister was the POA. She failed to pay the month's bill of 12/10/12. She made payment arrangement with the business manager to pay $60/mo. She paid until 4/19/13 when she voluntarily gave up the POA. I then picked up the POA 5/6/13. The nursing home is billing me now. Isn't she still responsible for the December bill?

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MCBRIDE LAW OFFICE | Robert E. McBride
When your father appointed you and your sister as his AGENTS by executing the POAs, he granted you the authority to bind HIM to contracts.So long as neither you nor your sister agreed to be PERSONALLY responsible for your father's debts, and so long as both of you properly exercised the powers granted to you by your father, neither you nor your sister should be liable PERSONALLY for HIS obligations. If your sister pays the nursing home bill, won't she pay it with your father's money? If you pay it, won't you use your father's money? Does it really matter WHO pays the bill if it is paid with your father's money?
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 2/21/2014
Hoang & Tran PLLC | Adam Tran
Probably not. A POA is merely agent (you or your sister) for the principal (your dad). The ultimate responsibility is your dad.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 2/18/2014
Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
Depending on what was signed it is your father that is liable for the bill. Normally a power of attorney does not make a person personally liable.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 2/18/2014
Edelman, Combs, Latturner & Goodwin, LLC | Daniel A. Edelman
The only person responsible is your father. A power of attorney or other agent is not responsible for the principal's debts unless they sign individually, not as agent.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 2/18/2014
Law Office of Richard Winkler | Richard Winkler
No. The obligation is your father's.
Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
Replied: 2/18/2014
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