Is it possible to travel overseas even with pending DUI case? 75 Answers as of June 14, 2013

Is it possible to travel overseas even with pending DUI case? Can I go to another country first before settling the case?

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Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC
Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC | Thomas A. Medford, Jr.
Yes but if your driver"s license is suspended it may affect your ability to operate a vehicle in a foreign country or to get an international driver"s license.
Answer Applies to: District of Columbia
Replied: 8/16/2012
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
If you need specific legal advice for your particular circumstances, I encourage you to privately consult with a lawyer. If you are charged with an offense and cannot afford to pay for your own defense, the court may appoint you an attorney payable at the public's expense. You have a right to counsel. You may be able to; however, it will require the court's permission and may require a motion to modify your bond. It depends on the circumstances. If it's a family emergency, the odds are better that a judge would consider it as opposed to vacation plans or some non-essential travel.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 7/20/2012
Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
If you were released on your own recognizance, or on bail, or were given a desk appearance ticket , then uless there is an order restricting yuou from leaving the jurisdiction of the court then you are probably free to go where you please provided you do not miss any court appearances. You should talk to your attorney if you have oneor the court if not.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/21/2012
Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
Probably, talk to the court and they may let you go.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 6/12/2012
Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
It is possible. Speak to your attorney. If you don't have one, now you know why you should. There are a lot more questions that this that you will have during the process. Get a LAWYER!
Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
Replied: 6/7/2012
    Conway Law Pllc.
    Conway Law Pllc. | B. L. Conway
    Ck the conditions of your Bond. If they state you are to remain in Va, get your lawyer to seek amendment of the conditions.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 6/5/2012
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
    It all depends on your conditions or release (bail).
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/5/2012
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    This depends upon the conditions of your bond.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 6/14/2013
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Depends on the conditions of your bond. The judge could let you go or the judge could forbid it. Ask your attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/2/2012
    Law Office of Michael E. Dailey
    Law Office of Michael E. Dailey | Michael E. Dailey
    Usually yes. There may be a restriction on travel placed on a defendant as a condition of bond or court release and that may include not being permitted to travel out of the jurisdiction. This can sometimes occur on felony cases but usually not on lesser level offenses.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 6/2/2012
    Benjamin D Gordon, Attorney at Law
    Benjamin D Gordon, Attorney at Law | Benjamin D Gordon
    There will generally be no restrictions on travel from the court. If you have paid a bondsman to post bond on your behalf to be released from jail, then the bond agreement may restrict your travel.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Myles Hahn III Attorney at Law | Myles Hahn III
    You must request court permission officially and get it signed in writing before you can travel.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    When you were released on an OR release you made a promise to appear. If you were released on bail you agreed that your bail would be forfeited if you did not show up for your hearing. However, if your attorney agrees to he can stand in for you at the hearing and enter your plea of not guilty and set a date of the next hearing for when you can show up. There is no restriction on travel with a DUI pending.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Ryan Berman, Esq | Ryan Berman
    Usually you have to get the courts permission, based on the terms of any pre-trial release. It shouldn't be a problem though.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
    If you are represented by an attorney and your DUI was filed as a misdemeanor, your attorney can attend your court hearings and represent you, without you being present, pursuant to Penal Code Section 977. This will allow you to travel overseas. However, there will be a time when your appearance in court will be necessary and you must return to the U.S. and appear in court as ordered. If your DUI was filed as a felony, you must attend all court hearings, unless the judge grants a request that your attorney can represent you without you being present. You need to speak to your attorney about this before leaving the U.S.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Yes, unless you have a court order prohibiting travel, or posted bail bond with a no travel provision.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    You must file a motion and appear before the judge and get permission from him before you can leave the jurisdiction where the case is pending. If you are going for a good enough purpose, I am quite sure you will be given leave to go abroad, but having counsel by your side would be a better approach to this situation.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    Yes. The only requirement of California courts is that you show up for the case Otherwise you can go to Mars. But your bail bondsman might object if you are on a monitor. But sometimes the court when releasing you on bail will tell you you must stay in the state. Anyhow don't broadcast your trip and GO GO GO.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    I know of no travel restrictions if charged with a DUI, unless there are restrictions placed on you specifically by the court or your bonding agent.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Law Office of Robert Sisson | Robert Sisson
    You should be able to, however it depends on the wording of your bond form.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    It just depends on the particulars of your case and whether the judge has ordered travel restrictions. Even if there are travel restrictions, I would still make a motion to modify the conditions if they are prohibiting your travel.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Law Office of Mark Bruce
    Law Office of Mark Bruce | Mark Corwin Bruce
    Depends on what your or/release on bail order says.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law | Mark Thiessen
    Depends on what country you are travelling or flying into. Best to contact that countries consulate and ask. Watch out for Canada and Saudi Arabia.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 6/1/2012
    Law Office of James E. Smith
    Law Office of James E. Smith | James Smith
    Yes, unless there is a warrant out for you then you can travel as DUIs are just misdemeanors usually.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Yes if you have a lawyer, who can appear without you to finalize the case no matter where you are in the world. However, you do lose certain options such as trial when you are not present. Contact a DUI specialist to help you out.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Law Offices of Steven R. Hunter | Steven Hunter
    Typically a condition of bond is not to leave the jurisdiction of the court without the permission of the court. If this is true in your case, obtain permission from the judge and you can travel.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Dunnings Law Firm
    Dunnings Law Firm | Steven Dunnings
    Hire an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/14/2013
    Law Office of Ronald G. Draper | Ronald G. Draper
    Many countries have prohibitions for people with criminal records whether convicted or not depends on the country.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Law Office of Gregory Crain | Gregory Crain
    You will have to check with the people who issue passports and visas.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Mesiti Law | Benjamin Mesiti
    Though you are presumed innocent until proven guilty under US laws, that may not be the case in the country in which you wish to visit. For example, if you are convicted of a DUI in the US, you may be prevented from entering Canada. Each country has different laws, and you should consult with an attorney who can research the specific laws in the country in which you are planning to enter.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Clos, Russell & Wirth, P.C. | Gary A. Russell
    That is a matter of bond and can only be addressed by the court. If you leave the country while out on bond and without the permission of the court, your bond may be revoked and a warrant can be issued for your arrest upon your return. Always best to obtain permission from the court in advance.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Yes. There is generally no restriction in travels less the offense charged is a felony.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Michael S. Edwards, Attorney at Law, PLLC | Mike Edwards
    Usually so. The only exception would be that if the court has placed a pre-trial limit on your travel, then you cannot travel overseas. Also, if your charge is a felony, some countries may not allow you into their country with a felony charge pending. However, if it is just a misdemeanor charge, I don't think you should have any trouble traveling.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    The Short Law Group, P.C.
    The Short Law Group, P.C. | Shawn Kollie
    In Oregon you may only travel outside of Oregon with the permission of the court. Talk with your attorney about requesting permission, or call a DUI Lawyer with additional questions.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
    If you are on bond, you cannot leave state without courts permission. Same with oversees.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Glass Defense Firm
    Glass Defense Firm | Jason M. Glass
    You should speak with an immigration attorney well in advance of any travel outside of the country. Certain countries, Canada for instance, will not allow you in with a DUI conviction.
    Answer Applies to: West Virginia
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
    That depends on the conditions of your pretrial release. Also, flight problems and foreign problems will not be any excuse for failing to appear.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Law office of Robert D. Scott | Robert Scott
    If no warrant is placed in the system as a result of the pending DUI, it should not prevent you from traveling abroad.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Gregory C. Graf
    Gregory C. Graf | Gregory C. Graf
    Yes, it is possible. but you will likely require permission of the Court and your pretrial services officer. You need to look at the conditions and see if there is a restriction concerning out-of-state travel. Most DUIs involve a summons rather than a bond. If you are on a summons and have no bond, there is no restriction on travel except you must be present at all Court appearances. Check with your lawyer to determine if you are on summons or bond.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
    Yes you can go overseas, but you must make every court appearance or be jailed .
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Betts Legal Services
    Betts Legal Services | Shawn M. Betts
    There shouldn't be any problem with travelling anywhere you choose as long as you don't miss your court appearances. The court has no jurisdiction over you unless you are placed on probation or on a condtional realease, and even then on non-felony charges they are usually limited in what control they have over you.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Darrell B. Reynolds, P.C. | Darrell B. Reynolds
    Yes you still should be able to travel.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A.
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A. | Donald L. Blaszka, Jr.
    If you have a pending DUI case in NH, you should be able to travel overseas before the case is resolved provided that you do not have any bail conditions restricting your travel (which would be unusual).
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Natty Shafer Law
    Natty Shafer Law | Nathaniel Shafer
    Yes, you may travel while you have a pending case. Make sure that you are not missing any scheduled court dates. Also, make sure you driver's license is active if you plan to drive. You have 10 days from the day of the DUI to request a hearing with the DMV to prevent your license from being automatically suspended.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    Yes, just don't miss any court appearances or the court will issue a warrant.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    It depends on country you are traveling to. Canada will not permit entry and it is a crime there to travel with a pending DWI. I don't know of any other country that prohibits travel with a pending DWI.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    H. Scott Basham, Attorney at Law, P.C. | H. Scott Basham
    Yes, unless not leaving the country is a condition of your bail.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/31/2012
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C.
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C. | Michael Morgan
    You will probably need a court order to allow you to leave the jurisdiction.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Salladay Law Office | Lance Salladay
    Countries that restrict entry usually restrict entry based on convictions, not pending charges, but you would have to check the specific requirements of each country to answer the question.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein | Neal L. Weinstein
    Absolutely, if you are not convicted of the charge it will not appear on your record or background, but don't let it become a default or an arrest warrant could issue, and you could be arrested in the foreign country or arrested upon returning the US.
    Answer Applies to: Maine
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    The Law Offices of Harold L. Wallin | Harold L. Wallin
    You will need permission from the court to travel. Keep in mind that some countries, like Canada, may not allow you to enter because of the DUI.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    You can travel freely if you were just issued a summons to appear in court. If you were arrested and have to post a bond to get out of jail, then you will need court permission before you travel.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Khayoumi Law Firm
    Khayoumi Law Firm | Salim A. Khayoumi
    Yes, you may be able to after you or your attorney makes a formal request asking the court to modify your "conditions of release" so that you can travel overseas. After the Judge approves the request you are free to travel but required to return on the date of trial.
    Answer Applies to: New Mexico
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Larry K. Dunn & Associates | Larry K. Dunn
    If a person was released on his own recognizance (OR'd), they need permission from the court to travel outside the State. If a person posted bail, they may need permission from the Bail Bondsman to travel outside the State. As long as permission is received and the person appears at their scheduled court date, it is possible to travel overseas while their dui case is pending.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    Yes, it is possible as long as the bond allow the travel.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    If you are out on bond the conditions of the bond will apply. It is necessary for you to be out of the country I would discuss that with a competent attorney and make sure that there will be no issue with the court.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A | R. Jason de Groot
    It is possible to go overseas and to another county during a pending DUI case. Consult with your attorney as to whether you can or not.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Robert Mortland
    Robert Mortland | Law Office of Robert Mortland
    Sure but check with the court first to be sure.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Thomas C. Brandstrader Attorney At Law | Thomas C. Brandstrader
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/14/2013
    James M. Osak, P.C.
    James M. Osak, P.C. | James M. Osak
    You're NOT GUILTY of anything at this point. Afterwards . . . if you plead guilty or are found guilty . . . then that's a different story. Are you talking about visiting Canada? Or overseas? Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Robert Valles and Associates P.C.
    Robert Valles and Associates P.C. | Robert Valles Jr.
    Yes if court grants permission.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Elmbrook Law Offices
    Elmbrook Law Offices | Gregory Straub
    As long as you are back before your assigned trial date or return date, otherwise you would be found guilty of the matter.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    SPITAL AND ASSOCIATES
    SPITAL AND ASSOCIATES | SAMUEL SPITAL
    You should retain legal counsel to represent you so that you do not miss any court appearances if you plan to leave the state or country.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    You can travel as long as your bond conditions allow you to travel. IFyou posted a cash bond or property bond and the bond order allows you to travel, then you can travel. If you posted bond thru a bondsman, you must get the bondsman's permission to travel outside of the state.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Bruce Plesser | Bruce Plesser
    Ask the judge but most likely.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 5/30/2012
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C.
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C. | Steven Fairlie
    Yes, it is possible, but you should call the consulate first to see if the country you are going to will allow you in. For instance, Canada frequently refuses entrance to U.S. citizens with a pending DUI case.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 5/30/2012
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