Is it possible to pay old fines and avoid jail time? 74 Answers as of July 08, 2013

My husband has several warrants due to non-payment of fines and failure to appear. The things that led to his arrests/fines/warrants happened a very long time ago, but he hasn't gone to pay the fines because we cannot afford for him to do any jail time due to the warrants. Who do we contact to attempt to pay off the fines? Is there a way for him to avoid jail time?

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Law Office of Christopher G Humphrey PC | Christopher G Humphrey
Sometimes, especially city court.
Answer Applies to: Wyoming
Replied: 6/28/2013
The Short Law Group, P.C.
The Short Law Group, P.C. | Shawn Kollie
The only way to resolve these kinds of issues is to have your attorney work with the prosecutor regarding fines/fees and a Failure to Appear. These are unique problems that can result in jail time if you are not prepared. Talk with a knowledgeable criminal defense lawyer about the facts of your case.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 8/9/2012
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
You can send in money to the court to pay off the fines but eventually would have to appear in front of a judge and hope they will not jail you if you have paid everything off.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 8/8/2012
Law Office of George M. Derieg
Law Office of George M. Derieg | George Derieg
It depends. If these are just probation fines, then you won't be looking at jail time. If these are restitution fines, most judges will incarcerate you for that. Most likely, if you do not pay these fines off, they will turn into civil judgments.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/7/2012
Austin Hirschhorn, P.C.
Austin Hirschhorn, P.C. | Austin Hirschhorn
It is possible to pay old fines and avoid jail time. You should hire a lawyer for your husband who will get a copy of his driving record and analyze the unpaid tickets and warrants and then try to work out a payment plan for your husband. If he is successful your husband should not have to spend any time in jail. If there have been outstanding warrants for a long time, he has probably been doing something right lately to avoid being stopped by the police.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 8/7/2012
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    Two options - the most efficient - albeit not the least expensive is to hire a lawyer to post Attorney Bonds to lift the warrants then have the attorney negotiate the fines to recoup some of that cost. Advantage, no jail time. Option number two is less expensive, but has a little risk in that if the officer you reach is looking to clear some arrest, you may find your husband in jail - call the city where the fines are pending and offer to pay them. If you elect this route, I would suggest you drive to the police station and pay, not your husband. At least that way they have a choice to make refuse the money (not a good move since the city who employs the officer just wants the money) or take it and clear the warrant. Even if they refuse to take the money and clear, you can still opt for option number 1.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 8/7/2012
    THE LOCKHART LAW FIRM | CLAYTON LOCKHART
    Contact the court clerk, or hire an attorney to act on your behalf. It depends on the offense(s) that were committed (if they are misdemeanors the offer to pay the fines in full is generally sufficient, but felonies can be a different story). The attorney can usually have more success in negotiating with the court personnel and the proscutors in a situation such as this. However, the disclaimer is that the final decision on whether any jail time is going to be served rests with the judge.
    Answer Applies to: Mississippi
    Replied: 8/7/2012
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    If a person has warrants for non-payment of fines and failure to appear this can be taken care of by going to the court that issued the warrants. Depending on the reason for the fines and the reason for the failure to appear your husband may not have to go to jail. If he waits until he is stopped by the police for something and they run his name he will be taken to jail right then.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/3/2012
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    I have handled many cases similar to the facts that you present. The various registry of motor vehicles (RMV) around the country have recently come online and been networked together. This has caused many people with old Massachusetts warrants, for failure to pay fines or costs, to now have their licenses suspended or denied renewal until old warrants are cleared. As the result, we have received calls from all over the country from people who had old open cases, in all stages of the court process, from prior to arraignment through probation after disposition, that now need to address the old cases. We have been able in almost every case to get these cases cleared WITHOUT the person physically coming back to Massachusetts to appear. There is no guarantee that we can do this since the true rules require that before a warrant is removed the person must appear in court, in person. Despite this requirement, we have been able to save a lot of people travel and lodging expenses and cleared every one of these cases.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 8/3/2012
    Hunter Law Offices, PLLC
    Hunter Law Offices, PLLC | S. Christopher Hunter
    I am guessing that there are outstanding warrants out for his arrest. In these situations the best thing to do is hire an attorney and see if they can negotiate something with the prosecutor. The other option is for him to just go on in and turn himself in and throw himself on the mercy of the court. Also depending on the charges etc, the statute of limitations (the time they have to charge him) may have run. I don't know how old he is but he definitely should clear these up before her wants to recieve social security as they will not give him benefits if he has outstanding warrants. Also if he is in Wayne or Washtenaw Counties, they have a street court program for just these types of cases. It would never hurt to call your local court and see what programs they have if any.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/3/2012
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A.
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A. | Donald L. Blaszka, Jr.
    In order to resolve the outstanding warrants in New Hampshire for unpaid fines, your husband needs to appear in court and pay those fines. He can also pay his fines by serving jail time at $50 per day. While the arrests/fines/warrants occurred in the past, that does not relieve him of his responsibility to pay them or resolve the warrants. Additionally, if he failed to pay his fines, it is very likely that the court(s) entered a default and notified the NH Department of Safety, Division of Motor Vehicles resulting in his license suspension.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 8/3/2012
    Anderson Law Office
    Anderson Law Office | Scott L. Anderson
    Please contact an attorney to research what needs to be done. There is a chance that everything can be handled without jail consequences.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Alvin Lundgren | Alvin Lundgren
    Contact the court which is prosecuting the tickets. You can make a deal to pay the tickets, and depending on the charges chances are good he will not go to jail. You may call for a free consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Law Office of Charles M. Vacca Jr. | Charles Martin Vacca Jr.
    Usually, this all comes down to paying the penalties and fines (unless the underlying crime is serious enough to warrant further penalties from the court).
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    Without knowing the nature of all the charges filed against your husband, it is impossible to say what will happen to him. It probably would be a good idea to pay all the fines you possibly can, preserve the receipts to show the court you have taken care of them. However, only the judge can determine if your husband will have to do some jail time. It would be a very good idea to hire an attorney to represent him when he decides to turn himself in, and the court may set a low bond or give him an individual bond, because he voluntarily turned himself in.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    You have not given me any of the details of the charges, but he should reatin a good criminal lawyer to surrender to the court, get a plea deal, and get time to pay the fines. If you are not able to afford an attorney call Legal Aid or the Bar Association to get a lawyer to surrender him. It is always beat to clear up any bench warrants before he is arrested and has to spend a few weeks in jail before the case can be resolved. The fact that he could not afford to pay fines is not a reason to fail to make a court appearance. That just makes it worse. Judges cannot put you in jail because you cannot pay fines, they just get a civil judgment for the fines and it hurts your credit until you pay it.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    It really depends what the underlying charges are. If they're just infractions, he can go to the clerk and pay everything off. If they are misdemeanor(s), then it is more complicated and he should have an attorney do it so he doesn't get taken into custody.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    Contact the clerk of the court. If there is a warrant out for him he is in trouble but if not he can probably get the case put back on calendar and pay the fines. He might even be able to just pay the clerk.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq.
    Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq. | Jeffrey Lawrence Pollock
    It depends upon to whom the fines, etc. are owed. Consider hiring counsel to pay off the entirety of the balance due and then to later contact the warrant office and turn the Defendant in to the issuing authority.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Law Offices of Brian J. Lockwood
    Law Offices of Brian J. Lockwood | Brian J. Lockwoood
    It depends largely on jurisdiction. Here in Mobile, for example, the Courts are always open to a person paying their fines and court costs before being arrested. Thereafter, the citizen will want to appear before a judge with an attorney to explain the delay and provide proof that all fines are already paid. Under those circumstances, at least here, you can expect a stern look and a good scolding before you walk out the same door you walked in. Different jurisdictions have different rules and different customs, although they're all similar. I suggest talking to a LOCAL attorney who works extensively in criminal law. Honestly, if I had a client in this position, who was willing to pay all the fines and costs and then appear before the Court, I wouldn't charge very much at all...but my client would have a lot of piece of mind knowing that he or she had an attorney to assist at every critical stage of the proceedings.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Law Office of Gregory Crain | Gregory Crain
    Call the clerk to see who takes the fines, mail them in.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    He probably has a warrant for failure to appear either in court or before his probation officer. He will be arrested on the warrant, and then appear in court at a later date. I am unaware of any way to avoid being arrested on the warrant. More importantly, I would consult with an attorney in order to make sure that I get the earliest court date scheduled. Otherwise, he may end up in court for an extended period of time.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Law Office of Ronald G. Draper | Ronald G. Draper
    Depending on the type of fines and cost you can pay down what is owed. However, a warrant can only be recalled by a judge. As long as the warrant exist he can be arrested. You'll need a lawyer to recall the warrant.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    James M. Osak, P.C.
    James M. Osak, P.C. | James M. Osak
    You EITHER pay the fine(s) OR the Court will jail you. It's that simple.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Clos, Russell & Wirth, P.C. | Gary A. Russell
    If there are arrest warrants issued for your husband, he most likely will have to personally appear in court (with an attorney for his protection) to answer the warrants. If they were issued because he simply has not paid in full fines and costs, then most courts are simply looking to get paid and would probably not sentence him to any jail. But, the court certainly has the power to incarcerate him for failing to abide by the court's previous orders. He should consult with an attorney and have the attorney make arrangements in advance with the various courts, so you know in advance what will likely happen.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    Without knowing what the fines are related to (what charges/convictions), I would strongly suggest that you retain the services of an attorney to look into this for you. Bottom line: the problem is not going to go away by ignoring it. The last thing you want to happen is to be stopped for some minor traffic incident and have the officer see that there are multiple warrants out, and upon seeing this, take your husband to jail. Hire an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Larry K. Dunn & Associates | Larry K. Dunn
    A person with outstanding warrants is subject to being arrested. Contacting the court to arrange to pay the fines may avoid imposition of jail. Contacting the court in person is usually the best tactic to avoid jail however you could be arrested when you appear at the court.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 8/1/2012
    Halperin Law Offices | Ivan Halperin
    You have two choices: contacting the various courts yourself and getting the details or retaining a lawyer to do so for you. A lawyer will be recognized as your husband's representative, probably will have better access to information, and can negotiate a work out of this problem. My gut feeling is that you should do this only through a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    There may be consideration given if all the financial obligations are paid. You should consult with an attorney to determine what action to take.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Warrants can not be simply paid they reflect new criminal charges to be handled. You must turn yourself into the issuing court, with or without an attorney, and try to negotiate a recall of the warrants and a plea bargain on the new Failure to Appear criminal charges. You'll try to negotiate bail reduction or OR release. You'll then try to negotiate a deal or payment plan on the unpaid fines that caused the warrant, and try to avoid jail time being ordered. Turning yourself in voluntarily will result in a better outcome than being brought in cuffs to court after arrest on the warrants. That can happen if you come in contact with law enforcement or customs anywhere in the US. On misdemeanors and infractions, your attorney can appear in court without the defendant being present. While this isn't a 'capital case', you face potential jail and fines, so handle it right. Effective plea-bargaining, using whatever legal defenses, facts and sympathies there may be, could possibly keep you out of jail, or at least dramatically reduce it. Unless you're competent to effectively represent yourself in court against a professional prosecutor trying to put you in jail, most people hire an attorney who can.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law | Mark Thiessen
    Call a bail bonds and try to do a walk through. Once he pays the fines, then they will give him a court date. he only goes to jail for a short time until he just get sbailed out. Once he has a court date, then call an attorney and fight the cases.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Offices of Sharp and Driver | Matt Sharp
    Yes, he can avoid jail time by paying off the warrants and fines. He needs to contact the court that issued the warrants in order to make payment. Often things like this can be handled over the phone.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Thomas C. Brandstrader Attorney At Law | Thomas C. Brandstrader
    Clerk's office...but there is a warrant so you will have to appear in court.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Offices of Christopher R. Smitherman, LLC | Christopher R. Smitherman
    Unless you retain an attorney..... the only other likely choice is to turn yourself in. Before you do that.... you should check and see if there is a bond determined or your husband could stay there until the next court date. An attorney may be able to work out a deal whereby the warrant is recalled and jail can be avoided.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein | Neal L. Weinstein
    Yes, contact the clerk's office, but better yet, contact a qualified attorney like myself to negotiate the payment of fines and withdrawal of arrest warrants, or the police could pick him up at any time on the warrants.
    Answer Applies to: Maine
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Steven Alpers | Steven Alpers
    That is hard to answer. If there are warrants for violation of probation it would certainly help to have the money to pay the fines. The court may have its own idea on whether that is sufficient or whether there should be jail. It is always better to hire an attorney an go to court voluntarily, if your husband is arrested it will definitely go worse for him.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Conway Law Pllc.
    Conway Law Pllc. | B. L. Conway
    Go to the Clerks Office and start paying on them. They want him working and paying to.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    He should hire an attorney to contact the court to find out if can just pay fines without any jail time and to vacate the warrants.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    If you failed to appear in curt and have a warrant out for your arrest, with the assistance of counsel, you may be able to have the matter placed back on the court calendar for a hearing. You cannot simply pay a fine and avoid court.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Natty Shafer Law
    Natty Shafer Law | Nathaniel Shafer
    Depending on the number of warrants and the seriousness of the alleged crimes, it may be possible to avoid jail. If you hire an attorney, they can make an appearance for him in court to pay old fines. Without knowing the specifics of his situation, it's impossible to say for sure if he will avoid jail.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of James J. Rosenberger | James Joseph Rosenberger
    Typically, you can get on a court calendar that deals with quashing warrants. You will need to contact each court to find out when each has such a calendar. Thereafter, you can address the court on the inability to get the fines paid yet. An attorney can assist in coordinating this but that is the process in a nutshell.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Yes, a skilled lawyer can package up these matters and hopefully avoid jail.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    He really needs to arrange to go to court with a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Offices of Mark L. Smith
    Law Offices of Mark L. Smith | Mark L. Smith
    My guess the warrants are cost warrants. If your husband is found the judge will release him for the bail amount of the fines. He should surrender to the court and work out a payment plan.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    If your husband has failed to appear he probably has outstanding warrants and could be charged with failure to appear. Oftentimes, depending on the location of the Court, an attorney might be able to negotiate a resolution for payment of the outstanding fines and cost and have the warrants withdrawn. Otherwise, your husband may need to turn himself into the docket room, bond out (normally case bonds that equal the amount of the tickets that are unpaid)) and resolve the caes in Court.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law office of Robert D. Scott | Robert Scott
    It depends on the nature of the charges underlying the warrants. The only way for him to clear the situation up is to surrender to the jurisdiction(s) where the warrants were issued.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of Brian K. Wanerman
    Law Office of Brian K. Wanerman | Brian K. Wanerman
    If you are in California, if the failures to appear are for misdemeanor charges, if the failures to appear are more than one year old, and if your husband has done nothing to try to hide from the authorities, the charges generally can be dismissed through a Serna motion. Consult an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of Bernal Peter Ojeda | Bernal Peter Ojeda
    Call the court clerk criminal division and pay the fines. The judge probably will not request jail time assuming all fines are paid and assuming they are just traffic tickets.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Pietryga Law Office | Russ Pietryga
    Usually, the best way to handle this type of case is to file Motions to Recall the Warrants & Set matter for Pretrial. The key is to get all the warrants recalled prior to showing up for the first court date. If you don't you run the risk that you will get arrested at the first court date and sit in jail until you get an opportunity to see all the judges that issued the warrants. It helps to contact the prosecuting attorney and get a stipulation to recall the warrant prior to filing your motions. Judges are more likely to recall the warrant if you get a stipulation from the prosecuting attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    Talk to a lawyer. It may be possible, but it depends on too many details for me to answer here.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 7/8/2013
    Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD
    Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD | Mace Yampolsky
    Question: Is it possible to pay old fines and avoid jail time? Depends Question Detail: My husband has several warrants due to non-payment of fines and failure to appear. The things that led to his arrests/fines/warrants happened a very long time ago, but he hasn't gone to pay the fines because we cannot afford for him to do any jail time due to the warrants. Who do we contact to attempt to pay off the fines? Is there a way for him to avoid jail time? The procedure that we use is to file a motion to quash the warrants in court. and set him up on payment plan. Hopefully we can do that without the necessity of him appearing in court. But some judges require it.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Ascheman & Smith | Landon Ascheman
    Depending on the situation he maybe able to pay the fines and avoid jail time. I would suggest that you contact an attorney and have the attorney attempt to negotiate a payment of fines. There is no guarantee to success but that is your best option.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson | Kathryn L. Hudson
    At this point he probably has several Failure to Appear or Failure to Pay Fines warrants. You would be wise to hire an attorney that can negotiate with the prosecutor to set up a payment plan to avoid any jail time. The longer he waits the more difficult it will be to get a favorable outcome.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    What are the fines for (what kind of conviction(s). You should speak to an attorney in your area about your situation in more detail so they can better assess your situation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
    Anyone may pay the fines, but doing so might cause a problem if there are other "must appear" citations that are related. As the term indicates, a person may not just pay a "must appear" citation. Paying the related ones would destroy any probable cause defense. The court(s) might grant motion(s) to recall the warrant(s). If not, then bail amounts might be indicated in Maryland Judiciary Case Search on line. Here is the link: http://casesearch.courts.state.md.us/inquiry/inquiry-index.jsp If he cannot afford to retain a lawyer, he can apply to the Office of the Public Defender for an appointed lawyer in any case that carries the possibility of jail.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Douglas M. Philpott, P.C. | Peter J. Philpott
    I would pay all the fines and costs that are overdue before he turns himself in on the failure to appear warrants. However, I would strongly recommend appearing with an attorney to convince the judge jail time is unnecessary.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Gutin and Wolverton
    Gutin and Wolverton | Harley Gutin
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 5/29/2013
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Michael J. Kennedy
    Since the jails are so full and the system is interested in money, if he can pay a big chunk of it up front, they probably won't bucket him. Many counties have amnesty programs in place for old fines too, which you should investigate.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    LeadfootSpeedingTicket.com
    LeadfootSpeedingTicket.com | Andrea Storey Rogers
    You can contact each court where he has warrants and tickets and ask if he can be put on a payment plan to start paying them off. If he's not sure where he has warrants, then an attorney can do a warrant search for a small fee. There may be a bond that he has to pay to lift the warrant. It's cheaper to hire an attorney to lift the warrant (your husband won't have to pay the bond if he hires an attorney to lift the warrant) and get a new court date for him so he can pay off the fines. If he has never gone to court for the tickets, then an attorney can lift the warrant and negotiate a plea bargain with the prosecutor to see if the tickets can be dismissed or reduced to non-moving, no-point infractions. He will still have to pay fines and court costs, and possibly a warrant fee, but he won't have points on his driving record. If he just pays the fines and pleads guilty, then points will be added to his driving record. If he accumulates 8 points within 18 months, his license will be suspended for 30 days. If he accumulates 12 points within 12 months, his license will be revoked for 1 year. If your husband went to court in the past and pleaded guilty on these tickets many years ago and the court assessed the fines, but he just couldn't pay them off, then it's possible that the court might not allow an attorney to lift the warrant for him and the court will refuse to lift the warrant until all fines are paid in full. It just depends on which court these tickets are in.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    Pay fines using a credit card by phone. Then call a local lawyer to help vacate warrants and arrange to have him turn himself in.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Darrell B. Reynolds, P.C. | Darrell B. Reynolds
    Under the circumstances you mentioned, it would be in his best interest to retain an attorney to try and resolve the matter.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/8/2013
    Myles Hahn III Attorney at Law | Myles Hahn III
    It is not possible to provide a comprehensive answer to these questions without fully researching the cases, why warrants were issued, etc. These matters should be looked into.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of Charles J. Block
    Law Office of Charles J. Block | Charles J. Block
    Contact each Court and ask them what it will take to satisfy his warrant - many times you can post the required bail and then sign a Bail Waiver which means you husband would not have to appear and the Court would keep the bail as payment for the matter. Because of the age of the tickets, you should ask the Court to dismiss the tickets and keep the money as "Contempt" for failing to timely handle the matters. Be careful not to plead guilty to a charge which could result in jail time. Usually, when Bail is posted the Warrant is lifted and a new Court date is given wherein your husband could appear and try to get the charges converted to Contempt.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Dennis P. Mikko Attorney at Law | Dennis P. Mikko
    Depending on what the fines are for, by paying them the warrants may be recalled and he would not face jail time. If he is arrested ont he warrants, he will go to jail. You should seek the advise of an attorney who could make arrangements for the payment of the fines and negotiate a final resolution.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    Get an attorney and see if there can be some agreements and compromises to clear his issues. There are no guarantees, especially in situation such as this.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Law Office of Michael E. Dailey
    Law Office of Michael E. Dailey | Michael E. Dailey
    You do not say what kind of tickets they are. If it is minor traffic, it might be paid with out jail time involved but points may go on his license which could get him suspended or revoked. If there is non payment of fines that has already been assessed with a guilty plea, he may already have a hold on his license that will need to be cleared with the court and the Dept. of Revenue. If it is something other than minor traffic, you may need a lawyer to work this out through the prosecutor and court. What you think should just be a fine may actually carry a jail sentence with it.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    Jail time is not automatic in cases like yours, however, it may be handed down given the extent of the previous charges and how long the warrants have been outstanding. Besides paying for the fine, your husband must make a court appearance because of the warrants.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    EMMANUEL OSAGIE EKE, APLC. | EMMANUEL OSAGIE EKE
    Yes. Most tickets/warrants can be resolved without going to jail, by paying fines which usually will include court's cost. It is advisable to have an attorney assist you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A | R. Jason de Groot
    Only a privately retained attorney can do something about these issues, negotiate a resolution with the State. And only an attorney who knows all the facts can answer this question.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Salladay Law Office | Lance Salladay
    In this situation you should get the assistance of an attorney. The longer you delay the worse it gets. He can contact the Court clerk to see if he can come in and pay the fines without being arrested, but with the warrants it is likely he is going to have to see a judge and an attorney can arrange to have a hearing set up without getting him arrested- in an effort to get the warrants quashed and get the fines paid.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 7/31/2012
    Cook & Cook Law Firm, PLLC (SanAntonioDefenders)
    Cook & Cook Law Firm, PLLC (SanAntonioDefenders) | Megan V. Cook
    If he has the fines due to warrants for just municipal tickets, then he should definitely hire a ticket lawyer to handle this. He should be able to pay and avoid jail time. If he has a pending class A or class B misdemeanor or a felony, then he will need to hire a lawyer, get the fines together and appear in court. Depending on how long he has been in fugitive status, the lawyer may be able to help him avoid a jail sentence. The sooner he gets it handled the better.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/26/2012
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    It depends on what type of cases they are. If it is just traffic offenses, then he can likely pay the fines to resolve things. If it is misdemeanor cases (theft, assault, drugs, etc.) then he likely will have to go to court to straighten things out. Often, if it is a small bond ($1,000 or less) it can be paid at the court clerks office and he would not have to go to jail. Of course hiring a lawyer to advise you would probably easily clear all this up. You can try calling the court where the fines were imposed and see what they say as well.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/31/2012
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