Is it possible to get spousal support and have your husband pay for the attorney fees? 14 Answers as of January 28, 2014

My husband left and said that he wants to have a life and that he loves me, but is longer in love with me. I met him when I was 12 years old and became pregnant with our first child. I was 12 and he was 15 almost 16. I delivered our 2nd child when I was 15 and we got married. I'm now 31 and devastated and have been married for 20 years this month. I work but not making much money and a little unsure what to do. Trying to keep it together for my children (16 and 18). He is boasting that I have no money so I can't afford an attorney and will not be able to fight him in court. He has offered to give me the house and child support, but I know he has a retirement account as do I, but he has a lot more money in it than I do. I'm not sure if it's possible for me to get the house, child support until our last child is 18, part of his retirement and spousal support, also for him to pay my attorney fees, so that I can get on my feet, he has truly been the one caring for the family.

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Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Riana Durrett
Yes, it's possible to have the court order one spouse to pay for the other spouse's attorney fees. Many courts are hesitant to do so, but you have a good argument to be awarded such help because of the disparity in income. It is entirely possible for you to be awarded child support, spousal support, your community interest in your home, your community interest in his retirement account, and help with your attorney fees because you are entitled to half of the community property, the length of the marriage, and the disparity in income.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 1/28/2014
Law Office of Robert E McCall | Robert McCall
Yes to both questions. The decision is for the Judge.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 1/27/2014
Peters Law, PLLC
Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
Talk with the local family law attorney now.. Very likely that you will be able to get spousal support and have him pay the attorney fees. You need to go over all the details with your attorney.
Answer Applies to: Idaho
Replied: 1/27/2014
Law Offices of Arlene D. Kock
Law Offices of Arlene D. Kock | Arlene D. Kock
From the description of your situation, it's self-evident that you would be entitled to child support spousal support and an equal division of all community property retirement accounts and a community property interest in the house.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/24/2014
James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C.
James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C. | James T. Weiner
contact a local divorce attorney .. regardless of what you say you need one..BTW a court may, but is not obligated to, force him to pay your attorneys fees if your income is so different.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 1/24/2014
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A.
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A. | Joanna Mitchell
    You need to consult with an attorney in order to protect yourself and your children, as well as receive everything to which you are entitled. Many attorneys offer free consultations and some may work with you the attorney fees, although at least some amount would need to be obtained up front as a "Retainer Fee."
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 1/27/2014
    Mediation Services of Southwest Florida
    Mediation Services of Southwest Florida | Dennis J. Leffert, J.D.
    I suggest you consider contacting Legal Aid to assist you in your divorce. They do a great job for their clients. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 1/27/2014
    Kirby G. Moss PC | Kirby G. Moss
    All your questions depend on the facts of your situation, but based on what you have stated, you could potentially get attorney fees for the divorce and temporary maintenance while the divorce is pending. If you retain custody of the children, child support is a given and the retirement account are a marital asset subject to division in the divorce.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 1/27/2014
    Grace Law Offices of John F Geraghty Jr.
    Grace Law Offices of John F Geraghty Jr. | John F. Geraghty, Jr.
    Attorney fees depend on whether there is some wrongdoing on his part or that he has caused you to spend money for an Attorney unnecessarily.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 1/27/2014
    Law Office of Annette M. Cox, PLLC
    Law Office of Annette M. Cox, PLLC | Annette M. Cox
    My suggestion would be to consult an attorney. You are entitled to of contributions made to his retirement account during the marriage. It sounds like you might be entitled to spousal maintenance as well, depending upon his financial resources and your education/work history.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 1/27/2014
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
    Yes, you can receive support (child and spousal), help with your attorney's fees, and still get everything you are entitled to in the division of assets and debts.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/24/2014
    Diane l. Berger | Diane L. Berger
    Based on the information provided, your requests sound reasonable and attainable to me.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 1/24/2014
    Graves Law Firm
    Graves Law Firm | Steve Graves
    All of those things are possibilities. But few if any lawyers will take your case for nothing in hopes of making the other side pay, so you need to be prepared to pay something up front or see if you can qualify for legal aid which you probably can't if you're working. You need a lawyer badly enough to figure out how to hire one, ma'am. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 1/24/2014
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Frances An
    Yes, it is possible to get what you need. Please consult with an attorney in your area. You can get him to pay your attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/24/2014
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