Is it legal for your attorney to ask for a copy of your social security card upon request of the suing party? 15 Answers as of March 18, 2013

Do you have to agree? Is it legal for your lawyer to have you do the interrogation questions over the phone?

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Law Office of Christian Menard
Law Office of Christian Menard | Christian Menard
There was a time when your social security number was protected from disclosure. However, now, the defendant is entitled to it so they can ascertain whether you received any medicare or medical benefits. If you did those liens must be satisfied from any settlement funds.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/18/2013
Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A.
Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A. | Paul L. Whitfield
Take your legal advice from your lawyer. If you do not trust him, fire him, get another and take his advice.It is often necessary to use SS numbers for ID I have no idea why your lawyer asked although he surely does. Why do not you ask him or fire him
Answer Applies to: North Carolina
Replied: 3/14/2013
A. Dawn Hayes & Assoc. P.A.
A. Dawn Hayes & Assoc. P.A. | A. Dawn Hayes
Yes to both of your questions, however, your attorney should make sure that the copy of your social security card NOT be apart of any public record.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 3/14/2013
Law Office of Lisa Hurtado McDonnell | Lisa Hurtado McDonnell
Yes, it is discoverable. Yes, it you don't feel comfortable, ask to respond in writing or ask to review answers before submitting them to a posing party.
Answer Applies to: Utah
Replied: 3/14/2013
Law Offices of Ronald A. Steinberg & Associates | Ronald A. Steinberg, BA, MA, JD
Yes to both. Otherwise, you will have to make an appointment and go to the lawyer's office.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 3/14/2013
    James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C.
    James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C. | Jim Hasser
    You don't have to give your SS#, but more than likely, if you don't, the other side will ask the Court to order you to and if you don't comply with the judge's order, the judge is likely to kick your case out of court. The other side is allowed to discover anything that could likely be admissible in the case. Presuming you have an injury case, almost all your medical records will be indexed by SS# and they will need the number to get those records. Your income records will be indexed that way too. The other side is entitled to get those records if you are claiming injuries and lost income. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 3/14/2013
    Law Offices of Tanya Gendelman, P.C.
    Law Offices of Tanya Gendelman, P.C. | Tanya Gendelman, Esq.
    Yes, you should provide your social security, it is standard procedure.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/13/2013
    S. Joseph Schramm | Joseph Schramm
    Discovery of information about a person is fair game in a law suit as it assists the other party(ies) in investigating and building their case. Discovery can be conducted by any means that, in the court's opinion, is possible and not oppressive or burdensome to a party. This includes answering questions (I assume for a deposition) over the telephone.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 3/14/2013
    Law Offices of Mark West
    Law Offices of Mark West | Mark West
    I generally never give out a social security number. There is no need for it unless there is some claim of identity theft or something. There should be some compelling reason for the other side to need a social security number and they should have to prove that reason to a court. Too much information is available once a social security number is given out. As for "interrogation" over the phone, are you talking about answering interrogatories over the phone or giving a deposition over the phone. These are different things. You have to sign interrogatory (written questions) responses under penalty of perjury and should therefore see the questions and answers before you sign them. If it is a deposition, (oral questioning by an adverse attorney [generally) that can be taken over the phone, but the court reporter should be present where you are and again you are put under oath for the deposition.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/13/2013
    Curry, Roby & Mulvey Co., LLC
    Curry, Roby & Mulvey Co., LLC | Bruce A. Curry
    There is nothing illegal about requesting the card, and the other party may very well be entitled to that information as part of discovery, depending upon what state you are in and the nature of your case. Attorneys routinely attempt to have their clients answer another party's interrogatories over the phone in order to avoid requiring the client to take time off work and/or travel to their office. If you felt like you were being grilled by your attorney, remember he is asking you questions posed by the other party's attorney, not questions that he made up himself. He also my very well have been "grilling" you to see evaluate how you respond and to prepare you for a later deposition during which he other party's attorney may question you very aggressively.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 3/13/2013
    Law Offices of Mark L. Smith
    Law Offices of Mark L. Smith | Mark L. Smith
    Yes and yes.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 3/13/2013
    Law Ofices of Edwin K. Niles | Edwin K. Niles
    Yes and yes.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/13/2013
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C.
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C. | Andrew Velonis
    The answer to your first two questions is "yes". As to depositions over the phone, that is not common, but it is legal.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/13/2013
    The Law Office of Stephen R. Chesley, LLC
    The Law Office of Stephen R. Chesley, LLC | Stephen R. Chesley
    If you are bring a personal injury action, your social security number is needed to process certain medical forms and medicare filing requirements.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/13/2013
    Law Offices of William S. Lindheim | Fred Fong
    No, it is not illegal. A person can ask for anything, but whether the attorney can force you to produce the information is a different question. Since you want to know if an attorney can ask, the answer is yes he or she can ask. It is legal also for the lawyer to have you ask questions over the phone as well.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/13/2013
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney