Is it legal for a 16 year old high school to sign their name to something at school without parental consent? 24 Answers as of September 20, 2012

I am a minor who signed my name to a statement I made when a school official asked me to but I didn't have parental consent. Is that legal and does that make the statement void ?

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Victor Varga | Victor Varga
No idea without knowing what you signed.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 9/20/2012
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
That depends on what the statment is and what it is about. I would need more details.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/17/2012
Law Office of Melvin Franke | Melvin Franke
It's legal except it can not bind you to a contract.
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 9/17/2012
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
Yes it is legal and it is not void.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 9/17/2012
Danville Law Group | Scott Jordan
It depends on the statement provided, circumstances of obtaining the statement and the resulting consequences. But, generally, it is not necessarily a void statement or admission.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/17/2012
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Parental guidance or having a parent present to sign a statement is not a requirement that would void any statement that you signed.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Myles Hahn III Attorney at Law | Myles Hahn III
    Unfortunately, it depends on the circumstances. Make sure to tell your parents about it. They will decide if they want to investigate further.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Law Offices of Ronald A. Steinberg & Associates | Ronald A. Steinberg, BA, MA, JD
    It depends. If you signed a statement which accepts blame for something, then you were forced to violate your 5th Amendment right against self-incrimination. You may need to consult with an attorney who could review the document that you signed.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    David F. Stoddard
    David F. Stoddard | David F. Stoddard
    It is legal, and does not make the statement void.
    Answer Applies to: South Carolina
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C.
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C. | Andrew Velonis
    It is presumed to be valid, but could be challenged depending on what the statement is, the effect of the statement and the circumstances under which the statement was signed.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
    One would have to know the type of statement and its content. If the school instructed you to sign it, yes, they can. But the nature of the document has to be known for any further information.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Lombardi Law Firm
    Lombardi Law Firm | Steve Lombardi
    Well what was it you signed and how was it to be used? A teacher ask you to sign your homework. A teacher can ask you to sign an exam paper. Can a teacher ask you to sign a statement intending to use it against the student criminally? They can ask, but can it be used? That's another question altogether. But ask yourself this, what are you involved with that teachers are asking you to sign a document that would concern you if your parents weren't present? What the heck are you doing at school? Are you there to learn or to run a criminal enterprise? Are you there to learn how to earn a living or attend college and succeed or are you there wasting your time? Get a clue; every day you make a decision about whether you will be a success or a failure. Only you make that decision, not your parents, your teachers or anyone else. You and you alone determine success or failure. If you're a loser it's because that is the choice you made. Don't blame it on anyone but yourself. So tell you what, the lawyer in my would give you one answer and the coach and father quite another.
    Answer Applies to: Iowa
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C.
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C. | Robert Kelly
    Usually, anybody over the age of about 8 or so can be considered competent to be a witness, depending on whether they know the difference between the truth and a lie. If somebody under 18 signs a contract, though, the contract is void because minors do not have the legal capacity to enter into binding contracts.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Law Office of Lisa Hurtado McDonnell | Lisa Hurtado McDonnell
    What was the statement for. Did you admit to committing a crime or a violation of a school rule. Or were you a witness to someone else committing a crime or a violation of a school rule. If you are a suspect and you were questioned regarding a crime by the police, then the police need to notified your parents and advised them of your right to an attorney before any questioning. School rules vary regarding parent notification, you will have check your school rules.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
    A minor may not enter into a contract but is free to sign anything else.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Paris Blank LLP
    Paris Blank LLP | Irving M Blank
    Under most circumstances, it is legal. You need to give more details about what you signed for a more definite answer.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Law Office of Evan E. Zelig
    Law Office of Evan E. Zelig | Evan E. Zelig
    If it were a contract it may be voidable; however depending on what the statement was (confession, admission or otherwise) it may be used against you without parental consent to your signature depending on the circumstances.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/17/2012
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