Is giving false statement on the stand considered perjury? 45 Answers as of May 22, 2013

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Anderson Law Office
Anderson Law Office | Scott L. Anderson
Yes.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 5/22/2013
Law office of Robert D. Scott | Robert Scott
Yes.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 5/22/2013
Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq.
Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq. | Jeffrey Lawrence Pollock
Perjury is "lying under oath."
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 9/13/2012
Law Office of Jared Altman
Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
Yes.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 5/22/2013
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
Yes.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/7/2012
    Attorney at Law | John P. Rivers
    Georgia law provides as follows (O.C.G.A. Section 16-10-70: (a) A person to whom a lawful oath or affirmation has been administered commits the offense of perjury when, in a judicial proceeding, he knowingly and willfully makes a false statement material to the issue or point in question. (b) A person convicted of the offense of perjury shall be punished by a fine of not more than $1,000.00 or by imprisonment for not less than one nor more than ten years, or both. A person convicted of the offense of perjury that was a cause of another's being imprisoned shall be sentenced to a term not to exceed the sentence provided for the crime for which the other person was convicted. A person convicted of the offense of perjury that was a cause of another's being punished by death shall be punished by life imprisonment.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    Yes, this constitutes perjury, and if proven, you can be charged and sent to prison for it.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    Law Office of James Gandy
    Law Office of James Gandy | James Gandy
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    There are two crimes in the United States that require two witnesses. The first is treason. The second is perjury. So to begin with, unless there are two witnesses who can prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the testimony was false, there would be no case. Secondly, it is difficult to prove testimony was false without strong evidence of the fact. For example, if one were to testify that a person was dead. It would take two witnesses with solid testimony, or the actual person being in court to get a perjury conviction. The best thing to do in this situation is to remember you have the right to remain silent. Use it! You also have the right to an attorney. Hire one!
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    If a person has been sworn to tell the truth, a false statement is considered perjury. The false statement under oath can be hard to prove unless there are conflicting statements both given while under oath. One can be considered under oath in situations other than giving testimony in court. A sworn affidavit (notarized), or testimony at a deposition would also be considered "sworn testimony".
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Natty Shafer Law
    Natty Shafer Law | Nathaniel Shafer
    Yes, that is pretty much the definition of perjury.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Law Offices of Eric J. Bell | Eric J. Bell
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    If you testify to something under oath that is different in a material way from something you have previously sworn to it is considered perjury. The judge has no way to know that a person is intentional lying in most cases, but if it is clear from the documents that you signed or the testimony that you gave that one of them must be a lie then they can prove the perjury. Prosecutors do not usually want to charge their own witnesses with perjury, but will threaten the with it to get them to testify or to say what they believe is the truth. If you commit perjury in a criminal trial you are going to face a jail sentence of up to 7 years.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Christensen Corbett & Pankratz
    Christensen Corbett & Pankratz | Craig L. Pankratz
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    Yes, punishable by 5 years in prison.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/7/2012
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