Is filing bankruptcy my best legal option to help with bills? 21 Answers as of July 08, 2013

If I'm on total disability, can I get out of paying bills?

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Eric J. Benzer, Attorney at Law
Eric J. Benzer, Attorney at Law | Eric Benzer
Perhaps it is the best option. You should hire a lawyer.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 10/13/2011
AZ Law Group of Trezza & Associates
AZ Law Group of Trezza & Associates | Stephen Trezza
Your probably judgement proof. Take advantage of a free consultation with an attorney.
Answer Applies to: Arizona
Replied: 10/28/2011
Heupel Law
Heupel Law | Kevin Heupel
You cannot get out of paying your bills just because you are on disability. You might look at filing bankruptcy given that you need all of your income to pay your living expenses.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 10/10/2011
Bankruptcy Law Center
Bankruptcy Law Center | Bill Zurinskas
Bankruptcy may be your best option to deal with overwhelming debt, but you should get a free consultation with an experienced bankruptcy attorney to see if you are "judgment proof".
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 10/7/2011
Dan Wilson Bankruptcy
Dan Wilson Bankruptcy | Dan Wilson
You can file Bankruptcy to discharge debt, but of course you must pay on going expenses.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 10/7/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    When on a limited income with too many bills, bankruptcy often is a good option, but not always. That depends on the details. A consultation with a bankruptcy lawyer is very inexpensive and is the only way to know.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/7/2011
    Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis
    Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis | Eric Lewis
    Bankruptcy may be a good solution to getting rid of the bills you can't afford to pay.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 10/7/2011
    Law Offices of Robert P. Taylor
    Law Offices of Robert P. Taylor | Robert P. Taylor
    We'd need to know more to tell you if filing Bk is your best option. Could be that you're judgment proof and doing nothing might be a better option. Get a free consultation with an experienced bankruptcy attorney. Inexperienced or new attorneys tend to need business and sometimes that effects their objectivity. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/7/2011
    AyerHoffman, LLP
    AyerHoffman, LLP | David C. Ayer
    If the entirety of your income is disability (SSDI), your income is "collection proof." Your creditors may sue you for what you owe and win a judgment against, but they cannot force a collection of this income. A bankruptcy will stop them from bothering you and allow you to repair your credit. There are also many debt consolidation firms which may be able to help you get onto a manageable repayment plan with your creditors. you should consult a debt resolution or bankruptcy attorney to discuss these options.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 10/7/2011
    Theodore N. Stapleton, PC
    Theodore N. Stapleton, PC | Theodore N. Stapleton
    You probably qualify for filing a chapter 7 and discharging your bills. I am happy to discuss these issues with you. Please call to schedule a free consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/28/2011
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
    You are judgement proof. There is nothing they can do you except harass you. A bankruptcy will stop that OR you can log all calls (and take a picture of the incoming calls).
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/7/2011
    Bird & VanDyke, Inc.
    Bird & VanDyke, Inc. | David VanDyke
    Under most circumstances disability income is exempt from attachment by your creditors.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/7/2011
    Eliza Ghanooni, Attorney at Law
    Eliza Ghanooni, Attorney at Law | Eliza Ghanooni
    Bankruptcy may be an option for you but you need to speak with an attorney who can tell you what your options are based on your unique financial situation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/7/2011
    Law Offices of Daniel Moulton
    Law Offices of Daniel Moulton | Daniel Moulton
    Bankruptcy can help you. You may also try applying for a waiver of collection efforts from each company.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 10/28/2011
    AyerHoffman, LLP
    AyerHoffman, LLP | Melissa Hoffman
    Bankruptcy is certainly an option for helping deal with debt, especially when on a fixed income such as disability. Depending on the amount debt, how long bills have remained unpaid, and your assets outside of disability benefits, you may want to explore the possibility of negotiating directly with your creditors. Whatever you do, do not ignore calls from your creditors or collection agencies; though you may be collection proof, you are not judgment proof, and your creditors can opt to file a civil lawsuit against you for breach of contract. A bankruptcy attorney will be able to assess your financial situation and determine the best way to proceed.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 10/7/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Harris
    Law Office of Andrew Harris | Andrew Harris
    You cannot get out of paying bills if you are on total disability, unless you settled with all of your creditors or they agreed to forgive the debts which usually won't happen. Bankruptcy may or may not be the best option for you. It really depends on what type of debt you have and what types of assets you have.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 10/7/2011
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
    You can't get "out" of paying bills, but you may be "judgment proof". What that means is if you have no real estate to attach a lien to, and if you have no income that a creditor can garnish, and if you have no substantial savings in a bank account that can be frozen, then the creditor can not actually collect the money if they get a judgment. The creditors can not legally take the disability money you receive.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/7/2011
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