If you were pulled over, questioned, and then were "good to go" can police release your name in the newspaper on suspicion? 11 Answers as of July 17, 2013

If you were pulled over, questioned, and then were "good to go" can police release your name in the newspaper on suspicion? I was driving around and used an open wi-fi network to connect to the internet. A person called on suspicious vehicle but when questioned I told them my situation and they told me I’m okay to go. No arrest, charge or anything but they did take down my name and social (saying they do it to everyone). I don't think I did anything wrong and I was released on the spot. Can they release my info out to the public/police blotter? I was questioned, they took down my name. I ask this because I don't want the media to attack me for no reason and I don't want my name defamed for no reason. I was NOT charged at all, but they took down my name. Should I be worried about public?

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Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq.
Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq. | Jeffrey Lawrence Pollock
I do not claim to know their local publicity policies to deter crime, but if they are planning to NEVER charge you (which they can still do within the Statute of Limitations), then it would be unfair to "out" you publicly.
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 10/5/2012
Law Offices of John Carney
Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
The police can use the information they obtain any way they want to. If the press reports it and it is the truth then it is not libel and you can't sue or prevent the press from reporting on anything they want to, including a police blotter.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 10/3/2012
Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD
Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD | Mace Yampolsky
You have not been charged with any thing. I doubt that they will release any information.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 10/3/2012
Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
I would need further information to answer. You should hire an attorney to research this.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 10/1/2012
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
Why would they release your name? You did nothing wrong. They probably will not release it at all. They stop a lot of people and are not in the habit of releasing names of people they just stopped.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 10/1/2012
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A | R. Jason de Groot
    No, you can worry just as much as you want to, but it will do absolutely no good.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/1/2012
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    Now you are worried about what? A media attack? A media attack for what? You are nobody. Nobody is thinking about you. You are a cheap ass. You should be worried about why you cannot maintain a constructive relationship with a woman. I know why. Because you are a cheap ass.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/17/2013
    Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
    It probably not be released.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/1/2012
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    Yes as long as the information is true.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 10/1/2012
    Wilson & Cain, P.A.
    Wilson & Cain, P.A. | Gary M. Wilson
    Yes. All police activity (subject to certain privacy issues typically involving minors or sex-crimes) are available to the press. It's actually a really good thing, because if the records were not available, police could-and would!!-stop and harass citizens with no accountability. The frequently do anyway. But it's very unlikely that a log entry (as opposed to a blotter entry) is going to catch anyone's attention. Logs are (supposed to be) kept by each officer detailing every citizen interaction or activity that they make. "Blotter" entries are usually only those that result in arrest or further investigation. Unless you are a high-profile person, I wouldn't worry about it at all.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/1/2012
    Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
    Generally, under those circumstances, no name should appear. The newspaper gets their lists of arrest usually when someone is arraigned on a charge. That is when it is placed in the newspaper and not before.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/1/2012
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