If you got your residency through your wife's asylum and you get a divorce, can you be deported or lose the residency? 11 Answers as of September 11, 2012

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Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny
Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny | Svetlana Boukhny
NO, once you are a permanent resident, you are a permanent resident.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/11/2012
CruzLaw PA
CruzLaw PA | Alina Cruz
The short answer is No. However, there is not enough information to answer the question in your particular case. You can lose your residency for a variety of reasons.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 8/15/2012
Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC
Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC | Lynne Feldman
The residency is yours.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/15/2012
Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner, A PC
Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner, A PC | Brian David Lerner
Hello; No, unless the marriage was not bona-fide.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/15/2012
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Reza Athari
Not necessarily. See an immigration attorney.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/15/2012
    Law Offices of Patricia M. Corrales
    Law Offices of Patricia M. Corrales | Patricia M. Corrales
    No unless you entered into a fraudulent marriage for the purpose of circumventing immigration laws so that you could derive through her benefits.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    World Esquire Law Firm
    World Esquire Law Firm | Aime Katambwe
    The quick answer is NO. But I don't know the fine points of the story so I am assuming everything was on the up-and-up. Barring that, rescission of LPR is always possible at anytime.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Coane and Associates
    Coane and Associates | Bruce Coane
    Generally speaking, once you have your green card, you're fine, even if you get a divorce in those circumstances. This assumes there was no fraud, and this answer applies, in general, and not to any specific fact situation.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Law Office of Grady G Gauthier | Grady G Gauthier
    If you are US Permanent Resident and gained such residency through a good faith marriage, divorce will not strip you fo your residency. However, if you are still a conditional resident (many marriage based PR are conditional for the first two years and you must apply to remove the conditions after two years) then divorce can jeopardize you becoming a full PR.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal | Alexander Segal
    The answer depends upon what you mean as residency. It would depend upon whether you are an asylee or lawful permanent resident. Assuming you are a lawful permanent resident, you will not lose your status unless there are other grounds to revoke your status such fraud or misrepresentation.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Namita Agarwal
    Namita Agarwal | Namita Agarwal
    Not unless you entered the marriage for purposes of evading immigration laws. If the marriage was entered into in good faith, you should be fine.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 8/15/2012
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