If a Will is made out in one state and I die in another state would the Will still be valid? 14 Answers as of April 02, 2014

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Durham Jones & Pinegar | Erven Nelson
Yes, all states recognize each other?s laws and wills. If you will was properly created and executed in the state whose laws applied at the time, the will should be recognized in other states.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 4/2/2014
Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
Probably yes.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 3/31/2014
Ronald K. Nims LLC | Ronald K. Nims
As long as the will was validly executed, it will be valid regardless of where you are when you die.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 3/28/2014
LAW OFFICE OF ROBERT I LONG
LAW OFFICE OF ROBERT I LONG | Robert I. Long
Yes, under the sister-state doctrine, the will is recognized in every state.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/28/2014
Frederick & Frederick PLC | James P Frederick
Yes. As long as the Will was valid in the first state, the second state would recognize it, with some limited exceptions. Some states do not recognize "holographic" (or handwritten) Wills. If you write up the Will in a state that DOES recognize them and die in a state that does not, there could be complications. You may want to review your situation with an estate planning attorney. Wills are not always the best estate planning tools, because they require probate of your estate. There may be other tools you can use that would avoid the need for probate.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 3/28/2014
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Dara Goldsmith
    There is something called full faith and credit, if the Will was valid where executed and you move to Nevada, Nevada will respect the Will. It is a good idea to have your powers of attorney reviewed by an attorney in your new state if you move.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 3/28/2014
    Law Office Of Victor Waid
    Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
    Yes, if prepared and executed in the state of preparation correctly.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/28/2014
    Tarasyuk Law Offices
    Tarasyuk Law Offices | Anna Tarasyuk
    It may be, depending on that state's law about foreign wills. Since each state has different requirements for the validity of a will, if you are moving, you should speak with an attorney in that state.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/28/2014
    James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C.
    James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C. | James T. Weiner
    Yes, the will is still valid.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/28/2014
    Law Offices of R. Christine Brown | R. Christine Brown
    If your Will is valid in another state, it will be valid in California. You will have to provide the California Court with the law (of the other state) showing that the out of state Will is a valid Will.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/27/2014
    Sebby Law Office
    Sebby Law Office | Jayne Sebby
    Generally, yes, it would still be valid. However, some states don't recognize holographic (handwritten, unwitnessed) wills.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 3/27/2014
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    Yes, it would be valid since it defines how his estate is to be dispersed regardless of location.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 3/27/2014
    Ashcraft & Ashcraft, Ltd.
    Ashcraft & Ashcraft, Ltd. | Randall C. Romei
    A Will that is legally sufficient and valid in the state where you resided at the time the Will was created should be given full faith and credit in the state where you now reside. The Will must be proved as required under state law.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 3/27/2014
    Attorney At Law | James G. Maguire
    Yes. If the will is valid under the laws of the state where it was executed, it will be valid in all other states.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 3/27/2014
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