If there is no police video and I did not blow, is a police officer's testimony enough to convict me? 15 Answers as of May 07, 2013

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Hudson Bair | Hudson Bair
Assuming the testimony of the officer convinces 12 juror's or your guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, yes. You should consult a DUI lawyer, there may evidence relating to why there isn't a video that may help you get your case reduced or thrown out.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/7/2013
Lawrence Lewis
Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
Yes.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 5/7/2013
Law Office of Jeff Yeh
Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
Yes, especially if you don't have a DUI specialist to represent you. A cop can simply testify about his observations, including bloodshot watery eyes and poor performance on FSTs etc.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/2/2013
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
Yes, if the jury believes the police officer.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/7/2013
Timothy J. Thill P.C.
Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
In most cases, it is enough.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 5/3/2013
    Brown and Hayes Attorneys at Law, LLC | Christopher R. Hayes
    An officer's testimony is considered evidence and theoretically you could be convicted of a DWI offense based only on his word. However, a jury must consider all the evidence to be presented and then weigh that evidence in regards to what is more believable. You need an advocate that can raise a reasonable doubt in regards to the veracity of the officer's testimony. I would strongly suggest that you hire an attorney that has tried DWI cases to a jury.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 5/6/2013
    Law Offices of Marshall Tauber
    Law Offices of Marshall Tauber | Marshall Tauber
    It might be enough when coupled with the other fact surrounding your stop and arrest.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/2/2013
    WARM SPRINGS LAW GROUP | Elliott D. Yug
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 5/2/2013
    William A. Siebert
    William A. Siebert | William A. Siebert
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/2/2013
    Law Office of Robert Sisson | Robert Sisson
    Defends on the facts surrounding the stop.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 5/2/2013
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    Yes, if the trier of fact (jury or judge) believes the testimony of the officer, that testimony is sufficient to convict. A jury is instructed that it can convict only if it finds that the state has proven its case "beyond a reasonable doubt". The jury then decides whether the state has met this burden. Choosing whether to believe or not believe the testimony of an officer is part of the jury's job.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 5/2/2013
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