If the police are wanting to set up a time to talk with me about a crime, but have not arrested me yet, is that a good sign? 24 Answers as of March 11, 2013

If they have enough evidence on me, wouldn't they just get an arrest warrant? At this point, they have just came to my house wanting to talk. I was not home. I did email him asking what this was about. He responded a week later sating he would like to meet up to discuss something. I will not respond, and left a voicemail for a lawyer. Haven't heard back from the lawyer, so I am posting this question.

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Lawrence Lewis
Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
You need to retain an attorney. Stop looking for signs in tea leaves.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 3/11/2013
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
If they want to question you, then they hope you will say enough so they have a case. If they did not need this then they would just arrest you. Do not talk to them.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 3/11/2013
Prater, Duncan & Craig, LLC
Prater, Duncan & Craig, LLC | John D Duncan
The police do not have to be truthful with you, and are most likely interested in getting you to make statements against your interest. My best advice is to wait until you can have a lawyer present at the meeting.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 3/8/2013
William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
No. If you speak with the police voluntarily, then they avoid having to advise you of your rights. Anything that you say or write might be used against you in evidence.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 3/8/2013
The Law Offices of John J. Carney Esq.
The Law Offices of John J. Carney Esq. | John J. Carney
You were smart to call a lawyer and not talk to the police. Most criminals are not very smart and the police easily manipulate them into confessing and making statements that are later used to convict them.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 3/8/2013
    Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
    Without more information it is hard to give you an accurate answer. however, I can tell you that if you are being investigated, you need to have an attorney with you when you talk to the police.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/8/2013
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    More than likely yes, if they had enough evidence they would arrest you or get a warrant. That is a bluff the police frequently use to get you to give incriminating statements about yourself. It's rarely a good idea and you should never voluntarily talk to the police without brining a lawyer with you or at least conferring with a lawyer first. Remember, nobody ever has to speak to the police.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/8/2013
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    You may be the subject on an ongoing investigation, and the police are determining if there is information you have in assisting them with this investigation. It could be you are a person of interest, or it could be that the police feel you may have information about an offense. I would advise you to bring an attorney along with you before speaking with anybody from the police, and if you do go in by yourself, invoke your Fifth Amendment right to keep silent if the need arises.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Yes it is a good sign, but what you do from this point forward may change that. Ever heard of the right to remain silent? Don't you understand that they are setting you up so you can incriminate yourself with your mouth? Why do you think they need you to open your mouth? Because otherwise they don't have enough evidence against you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    It may or may not be. You don't say anything about the crime that the officer is investigating. I suspect that he is moving forward with or without talking with you. The result could be the filing of charges and potentially your arrest.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    Do not talk with the police without an attorney. If you do not get a call back, try a different attorney. Have your attorney contact the police officer and set up an appointment to interview with you at a place other than the police office. Remember the police are taught to lie in an interview. Attorneys are taught to catch them in the lie.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Law Offices of Marshall Tauber
    Law Offices of Marshall Tauber | Marshall Tauber
    Typically the detective is looking for ways to get you to incriminate yourself. Never speak to the police without having a lawyer present, you can never make it better on your own. There are ways to handle these matters and the first way is to get a good and well experienced criminal defense attorney to be on your side.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Law Offices of Laurie A. Schmidt, P.C. | Laurie Schmidt
    If you are being investigated for a crime or a criminal act, you have the right to remain silent. You cannot be compelled to incriminate yourself. Commonly, officers will ask if you will talk with them in order to avoid a Miranda warning because it would most likely be considered a consensual encounter by the courts. You should think very carefully before you talk with law enforcement about any potential criminal activity. You do not know, although you may have an idea, of the subject matter of the investigation. You do not know what evidence or knowledge the officer has or why he/she wants to talk to you. You cannot outfox or explain away a situation to the officer, especially when you don't know what else could be out there.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Kevin H Pate
    Kevin H Pate | Kevin H Pate
    The police often want a person to come in, voluntarily, i.e., not in custody so they can try to illicit information from a person someone who is not being detained. You should obtain counsel and heed counsel's advice.
    Answer Applies to: Oklahoma
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Henry Lebensbaum | Henry Lebensbaum
    Not necessarily and talk to an attorney asap before you do anything.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    Get a lawyer before talking with police you're right if he had enough evidence they probably already arrested you. They may lack evidence or have weak evidence on one or two things. If this is anything serious just say, "I want a lawyer." until you have a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Natty Shafer Law
    Natty Shafer Law | Nathaniel Shafer
    No, it means they are still building a case and want your help in building the case. Do not help them! Hire a lawyer before you talk to them. You will only increase your chances of being convicted if you talk to the police.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    It is potentially a sign that you are a suspect. They want an admission. Go only with an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    The Law Office of Jared Eisenstat | Jared Eisenstat
    It may be, more likely it is not, whatever you do, do not speak to the police without an attorney being with you. You are much more likely to talk yourself into trouble than out of trouble.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Ferguson & Ferguson
    Ferguson & Ferguson | Randy W. Ferguson
    Talk to attorney first. They are trying to get you to hurt your case.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
    No more emails to the police or contact. If they had 100 percent, yes you would be arrested. They need to talk to you as a suspect. Anything you say or do will be used against you. If the police happen to contact you, tell them you are seeking counsel. If this attorney does not return your call within 48 hours, find another. Also do not talk to anyone about the incident or post it on any social network.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    Benjamin D Gordon, Attorney at Law
    Benjamin D Gordon, Attorney at Law | Benjamin D Gordon
    I would strongly advise you not to meet with the police to answer questions. You can literally only make things worse for yourself, and cannot make things better, due to a quirk of the rules of evidence and hearsay statements. If they feel they have enough evidence to make an arrest, they may still do so, but you should not do anything to make it easier for them to do so.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 3/7/2013
    The O'Hanlon Law Firm, P.C. | Stephen O'Hanlon
    I think that you are correct. Never speak to the police or attempt to negotiate with them without an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 3/7/2013
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