If my boyfriend and I get married, will his child support be based on our total income together? 30 Answers as of June 03, 2013

If my boyfriend and I get married, will his child support be based on our total income together?

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Armand Fried
Even if you are not married, if you live together, the financial forms require that he list any contributions (like rent or food) that a roommate makes to the household. So your income and contributions will affect what he has to pay.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 10/28/2011
Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
No. His support obligation will be based solely on his income unless he quits his job and relies totally on your wealth for his support.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/27/2011
Alfred Law Firm
Alfred Law Firm | Janice Alfred
In Georgia only your boyfriend's income will be considered in child support calculations.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 10/26/2011
Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
No, I get this question a lot. Child support is based on the income of the parent. Step-parents may have a moral obligation to a step-child, but there is no legal obligation.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 10/26/2011
Law Office of Patricia Van Haren
Law Office of Patricia Van Haren | Patricia Van Haren
A new spouse income is not considered to be a factor in a child support case. The support will continue to be based on the income of your boyfriend.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/26/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    No. Under Minnesota statutes, only the income of the parents is relevant to a determination of child support.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 10/25/2011
    Dunnings Law Firm
    Dunnings Law Firm | Steven Dunnings
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Law Office of Michael W. Bugni
    Law Office of Michael W. Bugni | Jay W. Neff
    In general, no. The rule in Washington is that the income of a new spouse has to be disclosed in any child support adjustment or modification, but, is generally not used for calculating child support. Naturally, there is an exception to this rule. If your new spouse asks that child support be "deviated," then, your income can be included.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 10/25/2011
    Law Offices of Mendlovitz & Sanchez
    Law Offices of Mendlovitz & Sanchez | James V Sanchez
    Subsequent spouse (or even live in partners) income is not taken into account to make or modify a support order except in extraordinary cases. An extraordinary case is where not taking that income into account would make the child suffer extreme or severe hardship. How it WILL come into play, is that if you are paying for some of the bills and expenses of the household, it reduces his expenses and therefore allows him to have more money available and will be reported on his income and expense declarations. However, that is the case if you live together and share expenses, regardless of marriage.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/25/2011
    Elizabeth Jones, A Professional Corporation
    Elizabeth Jones, A Professional Corporation | Elizabeth Jones
    Child support is based on his income and time share with his child.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/25/2011
    Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law
    Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law | Gregory T. Buckley
    For purposes of child support calculations, only the incomes of the biological parents are used.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/25/2011
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 4 5 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney