If I quit my job because of this far distance, can I collect unemployment benefits? 9 Answers as of January 21, 2013

My husband took a promotion with his job that will require us to move approximately 80 miles away from my current job/home.

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Law Office of Tadd Dietz, PLLC
Law Office of Tadd Dietz, PLLC | Tadd Dietz
The eligibility requirements for unemployment benefits in Utah are set by the Department of Workforce Services (DWS). According the DWS website "In general, unemployment insurance benefits are paid to eligible workers who: have earned qualifying wages, are unemployed through no fault of their own, are able and available to work full-time and are actively seeking full-time work." See their website for more information . The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978, which amended the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, prohibits discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth. An employer must have at least 15 or more employees to be subject to this prohibition on pregnancy discrimination. According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission "It is unlawful to harass a woman because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth." See the EEOC website for more information . Further, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission points out that "Although the law doesn't prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that are not very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse employment decision (such as the victim being fired or demoted).
Answer Applies to: Utah
Replied: 1/21/2013
Law Office of Jack Longert, LLC | Jack Longert
There is a certain distance by which you can possibly quit for good cause and obtain unemployment benefits. I believe its worth trying.
Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
Replied: 1/9/2013
Ken Love Law | Kenneth Love
You may be able to...there is a provision under the unemployment law that allows for quitting of a relocation for a spouse taking a new job.
Answer Applies to: North Carolina
Replied: 1/8/2013
Steven Miller | Steven Miller
Probably not but you should contact EDD. They have a website where you should be able to get information.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/8/2013
WILLIAM L SANDERS, ATTORNEY AT LAW | William L. Sanders
No, no unemployment. The reason is because your reason for quitting is personal, and not related to your job.Personal reasons, even very good ones, are disqualifying in GA. No so in many other states. GA has but one exception: If the spouse that was transferred is in the Military, then it is non-disqualifying.That is the only exception carved out by the GA Legislature.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 1/8/2013
    Kram & Wooster, P.S. | Richard H. Wooster
    There are provisions regarding this situation. I would recommend that you contact employment security and ask them if that distance is sufficient to allow you quit because of your move. I believe that it is, but have not researched the issue recently.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Nancy Wallace, Attorney at Law
    Nancy Wallace, Attorney at Law | Nancy Wallace
    http://www.edd.ca.gov/Unemployment/Eligibility.htm The EDD website says to be eligible for Unemployment Insurance, one must be Unemployed 'through no fault of his/her own' . When you apply the employer will oppose the filing, stating you voluntarily resigned, creating your own Unemployment.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Roe Law Firm
    Roe Law Firm | Theodore M. Roe
    You cannot collect unemployment benefits if you quit your job.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Adams, Liming & Hockenberry, LLC
    Adams, Liming & Hockenberry, LLC | Sharon Cason-Adams
    Yes. You could get unemployment if you can prove that you "quit with just cause."
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 1/8/2013
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