If I left the country as a green card holder does it affect me becoming a citizen? 9 Answers as of September 09, 2011

I am a green card holder since 2007 I went out of the country to finish my schooling in the Philippines for 9 months. Will it affect the continuity if I will find my citizenship.

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Pacifica Legal Services
Pacifica Legal Services | Floyd Fernandez
Dear Friend, Possibly not. If you maintained your declared domicile (your official home) to be in the USA, then you can continue to claim continuous residence, and in a year, apply for citizenship.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/9/2011
Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC
Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC | Lynne Feldman
There is a presumption if you are overseas for more than 180 days that you have broken the continuous residence requirement. However, if the absence is less than 1 year then it is possible to overcome this presumption. You will still need at least half of the time physically present in the U.S. to be eligible to file plus 90 days of state residence, good moral character, etc.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/18/2011
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law | Linda Liang
As a green card holder, you are required to stay in US for 6 months in general otherwise, you will be seen as having abandoned your green card .However, there are a few exceptions, if you can find yourself in, you won't have problem with citizenship.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 7/18/2011
Law Office of J Thomas Smith
Law Office of J Thomas Smith | J. Thomas Smith Ph.D.
It may. To become a U.S. citizen none of your absences from the United States should last for more than six months. By being out of the country for 7 months, your continuous residence in the U.S. has been broken. You will have the task of persuading the USCIS that you did not intend to make your "home" outside the United States during that time. Also, you are ineligible for citizenship until you complete a continuous period of five years (or three years) of permanent residency. You must spend at least 50% of that time in the U.S.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 7/18/2011
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Reza Athari
As long as you are not outside US for 365 days and have valid reason to be out, no.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 7/16/2011
    World Esquire Law Firm
    World Esquire Law Firm | Aime Katambwe
    Yes it will. Any time you spend outside of the US will not count towards your citizenship. You are required to live in the US for at least 6 months of every year, but certainly more than half the total time you have been a LPR. So yes. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
    Fong & Associates
    Fong & Associates | William D. Fong
    It depends on the timing of your stay outside the US. Generally speaking a stay of 9 months will not significantly affect your citizenship if you have been allowed to re-enter the US. Where are you now?
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/16/2011
    Law Office of Christine Troy
    Law Office of Christine Troy | Christine Troy
    You need to enter the US now. DHS can take away your green card because you have been out for more than 180 days-they can ask you to prove your strong ties to the US. If you are out for 365 days or more then they can automatically take away your card.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
    Christian Schmidt, Attorney at Law
    Christian Schmidt, Attorney at Law | Christian Schmidt
    Yes, an absence for more than six months generally breaks the continuous residence required for naturalization purposes unless an exception applies.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
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