If I filed bankruptcy by myself, can I still hire an attorney to take over the case? 34 Answers as of February 18, 2014

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The Law Offices of Katie M. Stone
The Law Offices of Katie M. Stone | Katie M. Stone
Yes, you can hire an attorney to take over at any time; however, you might have an easier time by hiring an attorney from the beginning. Bankruptcy is a complex area of law and you want to make sure that you are fully informed of your rights before you file to fully protect you. I hope you found this answer useful.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 2/18/2014
Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis
Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis | Eric Lewis
Yes, but it could cost you more than just hiring the attorney in the first place because if the paperwork is not done right, a lot of work and time will have to go into cleaning it up and in bankruptcy, there are some things that simply cannot be "fixed" if not done correctly the first time.
Answer Applies to: Indiana
Replied: 2/14/2014
Law Office of Susan G. Taylor
Law Office of Susan G. Taylor | Susan G. Taylor
Yes, of course. But he'll probably want more than if he had started it himself.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 2/6/2014
Hayward, Parker, O'Leary & Pinsky, Esqs.
Hayward, Parker, O'Leary & Pinsky, Esqs. | Michael O'Leary
Yes, and in most instances it would be advisable for you to do so.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 2/11/2014
Paul Stuber, Attorney at Law
Paul Stuber, Attorney at Law | Paul Stuber
Yes you can.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 2/10/2014
    MCBRIDE LAW OFFICE | Robert E. McBride
    Yes. You should not wait. Retain an attorney to help you as soon as possible.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 2/7/2014
    GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C.
    GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C. | Richard N. Gonzales
    Yes, of course. If the attorney does not have to correct anything, that should reduce the fee. If the attorney needs to prepare anything, or correct anything, your fee will be adjusted accordingly. Of course he or she should appear with you at the Creditors' Meeting.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Lynch Law Offices, P.C. | Roseanne N. Lynch
    Yes, you can but some attorneys may want to re-file or amend if there are errors in the initial document. Not all attorneys will take cases that have already been filed and some will require that the full fee be paid even though the Petition is already filed but you should be able to find someone to help you.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Resnick & Moss, P.C.
    Resnick & Moss, P.C. | Mark Bredow
    Yes. You may represent yourself and then hire an attorney, but you'll likely have to pay the attorney more to correct any errors that were made.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Patrick W. Currin, Attorney at Law | Patrick Currin
    Yes, the attorney simply needs to file a Substitution of Attorney with the court. Be aware that by filing yourself, you may have created more work than had the attorney filed for you and there will also likely be additional fees.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
    Yes, they may have to fix your mistakes.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    A Fresh Start
    A Fresh Start | Dorothy G Bunce
    If you can find one, you can retain one, but many attorneys will not take on a case once it has been filed pro se as there are too many things that can go wrong and the amount of time needed to straighten out all the problems may exceed the cost of having the attorney do the case right from the start.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    Yes, and most probably you should.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Heineman Law Office
    Heineman Law Office | Jeff Heineman
    Yes, and the trustee will thank you for doing so.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Marjorie Guymon
    Yes, you can always bring in an attorney to assist you.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 2/7/2014
    Scott Goldstein | Scott Goldstein
    You can, but often an attorney will not take over filed cases because of the mistakes made by pro se debtors.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Law Office of Mark B. French
    Law Office of Mark B. French | Mark B. French
    Yes you can, and the Court and Trustee would prefer that you do so. Just be aware that an attorney may not be able to change some of the choices you have already made.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Bushhorn Law Offices | Thomas D. Bushhorn, Esq.
    You can and are encouraged to retain legal counsel for purposes of bankruptcy. Depending upon the issues presented would determine the attorney fees.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Steele, George, Schofield & Ramos, LLP
    Steele, George, Schofield & Ramos, LLP | Alan E. Ramos
    I recommend that you engage the services of an attorney to file the petition. Many attorneys, myself included, won't take a case after it has been filed (primarily because of the problems involved). It is best to have it done properly from the beginning.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
    Yes... and if things are going south, do it ASAP. Time lines are short.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Law Office of Lynnmarie A. Johnson
    Law Office of Lynnmarie A. Johnson | Lynnmarie Johnson
    Sure, you just have to find someone to take over the case. It probably won't be east or cheap, particularly if the trustee or judge is accusing of purposely supplying false information, so be sure you are front with the attorney so they know what they are getting into! Good Luck!
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Garner Law Office
    Garner Law Office | Daniel Garner
    Yes, many people do that. An experienced bankruptcy attorney would know what to do.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Moore Taylor Law Firm, P.A.
    Moore Taylor Law Firm, P.A. | Jane Downey
    Yes and that usually is recommended.
    Answer Applies to: South Carolina
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Law Offices of Eric W. I. Anglin
    Law Offices of Eric W. I. Anglin | Eric W. I. Anglin
    Yes, you can always hire an attorney although I would not be surprised if they charge the same as any other client especially if there are significant changes to be filed on your behalf.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Law Office of Barry R. Levine | Barry R. Levine, Esq.
    Yes, but it would probably be wiser retaining a lawyer prior to filing.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    David Andersen & Associates PC | Jeremy Shephard
    Yes, you could hire an attorney after filing. Many attorneys will charge more to take over a case than doing it from the beginning. It is often more difficult to go back and fix a case over doing the case correctly from the beginning. Additionally, there may be additional time constraints on an attorney once the case is filed.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    Westgate Law
    Westgate Law | Justin Harelik
    Yes, you can hire an attorney after you have filed on your own. The attorney will have to review everything you submitted so you are not likely to save much money on the attorney fees. He or she would not be able to use your bankruptcy schedules as being accurate since he or she needs to perform his or her own due diligence on your financial picture.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/6/2014
    DUSTIN DEISSNER
    DUSTIN DEISSNER | DUSTIN DEISSNER
    Yes if the attorney is willing to do so.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 2/4/2014
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