If I do not file an answer for a complaint - unlawful detainer, how much time I have before the sheriff can evict me? 4 Answers as of May 04, 2017

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
It will depend on how fast the court will grant a default judgment and issue a writ of possession. There is no way to know for sure.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/4/2017
Law Office of Jeffrey T. Reed | Jeffrey T. Reed
Maybe two weeks, file an answer.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/4/2017
Heinly, Benson, Killian & Kramer, An Association of Attorneys Not a Partnership
Heinly, Benson, Killian & Kramer, An Association of Attorneys Not a Partnership | Valerie L Kramer
Unfortunately, there is no exact answer to your question. Part of it depends on how promptly the plaintiff files the follow up paperwork and partly it depends on the Sheriff?s schedule. The countdown goes something like this: You have 5 calendar days to file an Answer from the date you were served. On the 6th day, the plaintiff is entitled to file a Request for Entry of Default and obtain a Writ of Possession from the Court. He can then hand deliver the Writ to the Sheriff?s office the same day. The Sheriff will then send an officer to post a notice at the premises indicating a return date. How soon the officer posts that notice is dependent upon their schedule. On the indicated return date (usually 5 days later), the officer will return with a locksmith and if you don?t voluntarily leave the premises at that time, will have the locksmith open the door and the officer will physically remove you from the premises.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/4/2017
Patrick W. Currin, Attorney at Law | Patrick Currin
It depends on when they default you and the Sheriff's posting schedule. At best 12 days, at worst 5.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/4/2017
Click to View More Answers: