If I added my son to deed but I find out he is not trustworthy, is there any way I can get his name removed and/or sell property? 18 Answers as of February 26, 2014

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Irsfeld, Irsfeld & Younger LLP | Norman H. Green
Ask him to sign a deed over to you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/26/2014
Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
Once he is on the deed you can only remove his name with a court order or his signature. You also can only sell it with a court order or his signature.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 2/24/2014
Law Ofices of Edwin K. Niles | Edwin K. Niles
This is why most estate-planning lawyers don?t advise adding a child to title. Try to get him to a notary after preparing a quit-claim deed.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/24/2014
S. Joseph Schramm | Joseph Schramm
Generally, once a person's name is added to a deed it means that he is a part owner of the property because you have, in effect, given away part of your ownership of your property. At that point the only way in which his name can be removed would be for him to execute a deed conveying his interest in the property back to yourself.
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 2/24/2014
James Oberholtzer, Attorney at Law
James Oberholtzer, Attorney at Law | James Oberholtzer
Not easily. It will take some additional facts such as fraud or duress to set aside the Deed.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 2/24/2014
    Law Office Of Victor Waid
    Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
    No, not without a petition to court and a favorable court order. Don't do it. Utilize a trust as part of estate planning wherein you can make the son a beneficiary, and if later change him out to another person if you desire.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    James Law Group
    James Law Group | Christine James
    Not without him signing off on it. It is never a good idea to add someone to the deed of your home. Hopefully he cooperates.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Dara Goldsmith
    How did you ad him? As a joint tenant or as a tenant in common? If as a joint tenant you should be able to remove him. Honestly, speak to an attorney about what you are trying to accomplish and the attorney can help you formulate plan.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C.
    Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C. | Brian Haggerty
    You'll have to sue him, unless you can get him to sign a deed back to you. That's why we never recommend that people make this kind of transfer, but done is done. Hopefully you have other assets let him know that if he won't sign the deed back to you you'll write him out of your will, he won't take a share of anything else. That might get him to cooperate. If not, sue him.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    Frederick & Frederick PLC | James P Frederick
    It is possible, but the deed would need to be set up properly. I would strongly advise you to use a lawyer to take care of this. It is likely to only cost you $200-300.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    If you recorded the deed, no. If you just kept the deed and did not record it, tear it up, shred it, and you can sell the property.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    No, he must release his interest.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    Estrada Law P.C. | Michele Ungvarsky
    It is never a good idea to place your child on a deed with you. If your child has financial problems, declares bankruptcy, is involved in a lawsuit, gets divorced, of the property under the deed is considered his and will be available for his creditors. If you live in a state that allows Transfer on Death Deeds you can execute one and leave the property to your son without the problems listed above. Please check with an Estate Planning Attorney for advice.
    Answer Applies to: New Mexico
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    Vandervoort, Christ & Fisher, P.C. | James E. Reed
    Probably not, but it depends on the exact wording of the deed by which you added your son to the title.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    The Krone Law Firm, LLC | Norman B. Krone
    You can ask that your son re-deed his interest in the property to you.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    Ashcraft & Ashcraft, Ltd.
    Ashcraft & Ashcraft, Ltd. | Randall C. Romei
    If you recorded the Deed then the only way to remove him from his ownership interest is to record another Deed that he must also sign. If the first deed was never recorded then you could claim that you never completed the gift and tear up the deed. He could contest the claim of completed gift based upon facts that show the gift was intended and the ownership interest given to him without holding back. Such evidence might be presenting him with a copy of the deed or telling him in writing of the gift.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 2/24/2014
    Ben T. Liu Law Office
    Ben T. Liu Law Office | Ben T. Liu
    No, unless he agrees.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/25/2014
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