I was with my man for 14 years he just passed away am I entitled to anything? 31 Answers as of February 05, 2013

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Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski
Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski | Gerald A. Bagazinski
You are not his next of kin.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 2/5/2013
Reger Rizzo & Darnall LLP | Kathleen DeLacy
Delaware does not have common law marriage so if no will, no.
Answer Applies to: Delaware
Replied: 2/5/2013
Durham Jones & Pinegar | Erven Nelson
If you commingled your income, assets, debts and financial affairs you would have a claim to something. I assume from your question that you were not married. There is no common law marriage in Nevada, but you do have some rights. You need a good family law and estate lawyer.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 2/5/2013
Law Office of Edward M. Burgh, APC | Edward M. Burgh
No, unless you married or registered as partners under the Act.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/5/2013
Law Office of Pamela Braynon | Pamela Y. Braynon
If you owned any property with him, you are entitled to that property. However, if he had heirs, i.e. children, everything would go to them. If by chance he had a wife (that he never divorced) she's entitled to 50% of his estate and the rest evenly divided amongst his heirs. If no children or wife, here's how the estate will be divided: parents, siblings, aunts & uncles, cousins. It will only go to the successive group if no one in the previous group is living.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 2/4/2013
    DOUGLAS A. TULL, P.C.
    DOUGLAS A. TULL, P.C. | Douglas A. Tull
    If you were not married to him - and if he did not leave a will naming you, chances are you will not be entitled to receive anything from his estate. Michigan does not recognize "common law" marriages - so you are just a "friend" and without a will, you get nothing.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C.
    Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C. | Brian Haggerty
    If you lived in a state which recognizes common law marriage, for long enough to be "married" under the rules of that state, then maybe.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Frederick & Frederick PLC | James P Frederick
    The answer depends on facts which are not included in your summary. You have no rights in the absence of a Will or Trust providing for you, or joint assets or beneficiary designations. If all of his assets are titled in his name alone, you would only be entitled if there was a Will or Trust naming you as beneficiary.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Alston & Bird | Jack Sawyer
    Georgia abolished common law marriage effective 1/1/97, which was more than 14 years ago. Your inheritance rights would be limited to any jointly-owned property, bequests under a Will, or assets for which you were named as beneficiary under a beneficiary designation form. You also could potentially have a contract-based claim depending on the facts.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    James Oberholtzer, Attorney at Law
    James Oberholtzer, Attorney at Law | James Oberholtzer
    In Oregon, chances are no. But your individual facts could make you an exception.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    It depends on which state you live in. Some states, like Washington, do not recognize common law marriages. However, if you can show that you both held yourself out as "married," had common property purchased while together, etc., you may have standing.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Dara Goldsmith
    Probably not, unless he left a Will that names you as a beneficiary. You should consult with an attorney to address your specific issues as your question is very generic.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Irsfeld, Irsfeld & Younger LLP | Norman H. Green
    You are entitled to condolences and to anything that he left you in his will.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    If you did not marry, you are not entitled to any of the benefits statutorily made available to spouses from a decedent's estate. Usually, in cases like yours, the question becomes "what is yours and what is part of his estate"? You are not entitled to a spousal share of his estate.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    James Law Group
    James Law Group | Christine James
    Unless you were married or he left a will or trust leaving assets to you, you are not legally entitled to inherit from him.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Law Office Of Victor Waid
    Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
    No, unless he willed his properties to you, or made you a beneficiary of a trust, or you held title to the property in joint tenancy which as a right of survivorship or accounts on which your were the designated payee, or your are the beneficiary of a life insurance policy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Doland & Fraade | Michael Doland
    If you were not married, no, since California does not recognize common law marriage.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    The Law Offices of Laurie E. Ohall, P.A.
    The Law Offices of Laurie E. Ohall, P.A. | Laurie E. Ohall
    I'm assuming you were not married. Unless he had a Will naming you as a beneficiary, or you were joint on assets with him, you would not be entitled to inherit anything.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    The Wideman Law Center, P.C. | Susan Wideman Schaible
    Only if he left you as a beneficiary in his will or Trust, or added your name to his accounts as a beneficiary or co-owner. Otherwise you are legally out of luck.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    CARL C SILVER ATTORNEY AT LAW
    CARL C SILVER ATTORNEY AT LAW | Carl C Silver
    No. Michigan does not recognize common law marriages.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    The Law Office of David L. Leon
    The Law Office of David L. Leon | David L. Leon
    Possibly. You can claim a common law marriage if: 1. You were both 18+ 2. You agreed to be married (this can be inferred) 3. You held yourselves out to the public as married (i.e. he introduced you as his wife) 4. You were not already married. You would then have a claim to the community property portion of his estate. This is a fairly complicated proposition. Get legal help.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    THE BROOME LAW FIRM, LLC
    THE BROOME LAW FIRM, LLC | Barry D. Broome
    Only if you were included in his Will. Your financial plan is not complete until it is co-ordinated with your estate plan. Will your family be provided for when you are gone? Without a Will, the court will decide.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
    If your name is not on any joint bank account, real estate, or anything else, no. If there is no will, and there is estate property, his heirs are in line for it. If you never married, a common law marriage, is not considered legal in Michigan to inherit.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    David T. McAndrew, Attorney at Law | David T. McAndrew
    Your question is incomplete. Were you married? Do you have property held jointly with the decedent? Did he have a will? Are you named as a beneficiary? Michigan is not a community property estate, so marriage is a dispositive factor.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    If you are not married, then only if he left you something in his will. If he did not, then you are probably not entitled to anything.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Neil J. Lehto, Esq.
    Neil J. Lehto, Esq. | Neil J. Lehto
    You may be entitled to a lot but, if your partner made no will naming you as a beneficiary, you may not get anything from his estate.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Kokish & Goldmanis, P.C.
    Kokish & Goldmanis, P.C. | Bernard H. Greenberg
    Unfortunately, your question does not contain sufficient facts on which to base an answer. I suggest re-framing your question with precise details about your situation.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Winnick Ruben Hoffnung Peabody & Mendel, LLC | Daniel N. Hoffnung
    Did he leave a will? Did he owe you any money? Otherwise, unlikely.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Donaldson Stewart, PC
    Donaldson Stewart, PC | Monica H. Donaldson Stewart
    If he left a will or a trust naming you as beneficiary, you would be entitled to receive from his estate as he designated (whether or not you were married). If he had no such paperwork and you were not married, then you are not entitled to receive from his estate; however, if you had jointly titled assets (e.g. a house or bank account), you may be entitled to receive his share of those assets (it depends on how the title was held). I recommend you consult with an attorney to discuss this matter in greater detail.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Gateway Legal Group | Christian J. Albut
    This would depend on the facts and if there was a will or a trust involved. If there was no will or trust then, unless you were legally married, you would not be entitled to anything.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/4/2013
    Law Offices of Terrell Monks
    Law Offices of Terrell Monks | Terrell Monks
    That depends on whether you two held yourself out to the public as married. Did you file tax returns as married? Did you own propert as a married couple? Did you have a wedding ceremony? Anything similar to any of these?
    Answer Applies to: Oklahoma
    Replied: 2/4/2013
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