I am an American citizen, how long will it take for my spouse to get residence? 14 Answers as of July 02, 2013

I want to know how long will it take for my spouse to get residence.

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Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny
Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny | Svetlana Boukhny
It depends on whether your spouse is in the US or abroad. If abroad, it usually takes about 9-12 months for the visa to be issued. If in the US, it usually takes about 4-6 months.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/8/2012
Law Office of Rebecca White
Law Office of Rebecca White | Rebecca White
The timing will depend upon a great deal of factors - if your spouse is here in the US legally now, if your spouse is overseas, or if your spouse has any prior immigration or criminal violations.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 3/7/2012
Bell, Nunnally & Martin, LLP | Karen-Lee Pollak
We will need additional information. Is your spouse here or overseas. If overseas, where does he or she live. This will impact the time it takes to get a green card. However, generally, it takes about a year.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 3/6/2012
World Esquire Law Firm
World Esquire Law Firm | Aime Katambwe
Less than 6 months if she came to the US with a visa or has protection under section 245i. If not with a visa, then a whole lot more information needs to be found out and I will recommend a face to face with competent counsel on this. Good luck!
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/6/2012
Oltarsh and Associates, PC
Oltarsh and Associates, PC | Jennifer Oltarsh
It depends on where you spouse is and if in the US, how your spouse entered. If you are confused about the process it may be advisable to hire a lawyer to help you through.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 3/6/2012
    Kazmi & Sakata
    Kazmi & Sakata | Harun Kazmi
    This will depend on if you file while she is in the US or if she is waiting abroad. It takes about 4 to 6 months in the US. It can take 9 to 12 months if she needs to get the Immigrant Visa at the US Consulate.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/5/2012
    Ayodele M. Ojo & Associates
    Ayodele M. Ojo & Associates | Ayodele Mayowa Ojo
    Did you file any application yet? Your question is so bare, it is difficult to provide intelligent answer.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 7/2/2013
    HADJIAN LAW P.C. | ZARI HADJIAN
    More than 1 year.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/5/2012
    The Law Offices of Kristy Qiu
    The Law Offices of Kristy Qiu | Mengjun Qiu
    Depends on your residence state, your wife's nationality, and where you're applying from, I.e. outside or inside the US. If inside, in Florida, you file all the paperwork altogether, on time, etc., and assuming there aren't that many people from her native country that live in Florida (so availability of visa is higher), about 4 to 9 months.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 3/5/2012
    Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C.
    Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C. | David Nabow Soloway
    The Atlanta Field Office of the USCIS generally takes about 4-6 months to schedule an adjustment of status interview in a marriage-based application. If the application has been prepared properly, sufficient supporting documents have been supplied and the interview is handled well, the application should be approved at the time of the interview (and the "Green Card" will be issued within a few weeks after that). If a final adjudication is not achieved at the time of the interview, the USCIS considers the application to be a "continued case," and the Atlanta Field Office does not consider itself to be unduly delayed unless it takes more than NINE MONTHS from the interview date to finally adjudicate the case. With a risk of such an enormously long delay, it is particularly important that one prepare and document a case adequately from the very beginning. Some immigration law firms, including mine, offer legal services on a "flat fee" basis so that a client will know the total expense from the very beginning, and a few immigration law firms, including mine, offer an initial consultation free of charge.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/5/2012
    U.S. Immigration Law Group, LLP | Lisa D. Ramirez
    It depends on where your spouse lives and whether your spouse can adjust her status in the U.S. or must go through consular processing. Depending on the circumstance, you may be looking at anywhere from 6 months to more than a year.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/5/2012
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal | Alexander Segal
    The answer depends upon several factors. The first is whether she will adjust your spouse will adjust here in the United States or overseas. The second factor is whether there are any issues requiring a waiver. The process in the U.S. generally takes 8 months to a year to complete. The process is about a year to 1.5 years overseas. Both can be longer if a waiver is needed. It is usually advisable to work with an attorney to ensure the application is properly filed and the case moves forward as quickly as possible.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/5/2012
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Hector J. Lopez
    The time-frame for your spouse to obtain lawful permanent residence in the US through marriage to a US Citizen may vary depending on the district you are in and on her individual circumstances. If she is eligible to adjust status in the United States and has no criminal records or arrests, the local District Office in my area is taking about 4-6 months of processing. This may vary substantially depending on the your spouse's particular situation and assuming no delays on her FBI clearance. Some Districts may take many months to process the same type of case.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 3/5/2012
    Law Office of Bijal Jani | Bijal Jani
    Presuming you are the petitioner for your spouse for an immigration petition based upon marriage, the processing time generally takes between 3 - 6 months, from the time the initial application is submitted through fingerprinting, final interview, and issuance of the permanent resident card.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/5/2012
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