How will a DUI affect my green card? 7 Answers as of March 04, 2011

I have my green card that is good for 2 yrs. And I have a DUI and I got arrested. What is going to happen with my green card, I am still waiting for the green card that is good for 10 yrs.

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Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
Criminal convictions can get you deported. It depends upon whether the DA or court refers your case to INS, and whether INS takes action. Every case is different.

Effective plea-bargaining by your attorney, using whatever legal defenses, facts and sympathies there may be, could possibly keep you out of jail, or at least dramatically reduce it, depending upon all the facts and evidence. Not exactly a do it yourself project in court for someone who does not know how to effectively represent himself against a professional prosecutor intending to convict you. If you don't know how to do these things effectively, then hire an attorney that does, who will try to get a dismissal, diversion, reduction or other decent outcome through plea bargain for you, or take it to trial. If serious about doing so, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me. Ill be happy to help you use whatever defenses you may have. If you can't afford private counsel, you can apply for the Public Defender.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/4/2011
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
Your DUI arrest should not affect your green card standing.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/4/2011
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
This is a question for an immigration lawyer not a criminal lawyer. I do know that DUI is not a crime of moral turpitude and usually not grounds for deportation. There are exception however and if you are deemed a chronic alcoholic ( probably based on more than one incident) it could be a problem.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/4/2011
Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
I believe that if it was a simple DUI whiteout injury or drug involvement you should be okay. However, no criminal lawyer should ever counsel you on immigration matters. Depending on where you live I can send you to a good immigration lawyer who is up to date familiar with the law. Immigration law changes frequently and is very confusing. If you live in the Bay Area contact Philip Levin in San Francisco and use my name as a reference. Dennis Roberts. If not in the Bay Area call me at 510 465 6363 so I can send you to someone good.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/3/2011
Law Offices of Phil Hache
Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
First of all, your DUI may be worth fighting, and it may be possible to get your DUI charge dismissed. The potential consequences of a DUI are very serious, even for U.S. citizens not worrying about green card status. You should consult a DUI attorney to speak about your case in more detail. In regards to how it will effect your green card you are waiting for, you should consult with an Immigration attorney who specializes in that area. Personally, I recommend hiring a DUI attorney to handle the case, then that DUI Attorney can speak to an Immigration attorney with you or for you to assess the potential immigration consequences.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/3/2011
    Alanna D. Coopersmith, Attorney at Law
    Alanna D. Coopersmith, Attorney at Law | Alanna D. Coopersmith
    One single DUI conviction will not result in your exclusion or inadmissibility.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/3/2011
    Law Offices of Michael Stephenson
    Law Offices of Michael Stephenson | Michael Stephenson
    A DUI conviction can result in deportation, even for long term permanent residents. One DUI conviction does not automatically disqualify an alien from applying for a visa. However lying about a DUI conviction on a visa application could result in fraud and misrepresentation which is sufficient cause for inadmissibility into the US.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/3/2011
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