How will a DUI affect my future employment? 15 Answers as of July 19, 2011

Will I have to get my record expunged or sealed because I was charged with a drunk driving?

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Law Offices of Jacek W. Lentz
Law Offices of Jacek W. Lentz | Jacek W. Lentz
A DUI record will be less than a raging success with present or future employers. Employers who would hire you for a job where driving would be involved would certainly care. Some other employers might not care at all. Expunging a DUI at the end of probation is possible but no longer automatic or assured as it used to be just a couple of years ago. If you cannot beat your DUI outright (very few people can), your best bet is plea to something other than a DUI. Even a so-called wet reckless which is only marginally better, technically is not a DUI and therefore better. Even better options are something like a dry reckless and exhibition of speed.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/19/2011
The Law Firm of Aaron Bortel Esq.
The Law Firm of Aaron Bortel Esq. | Aaron Bortel
A sealing of a DUI conviction is usually not going to happen. Expungement is usually the best you can do.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/18/2011
The Chastaine Law Office
The Chastaine Law Office | Michael Chastaine
You don't have to get your records expunged, but you should. Any time you can clear your record, you should. M
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/18/2011
Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
Adversely. DUI conviction will impact any employment requiring driving, many employers will not hire you, your vehicle insurance rates will increase for years, professional licensing is at risk, etc. If you are facing current charges, raise all possible defenses with whatever admissible and credible witnesses, evidence, facts and sympathies are available for legal arguments, for evidence suppression or other motions, or at trial. You can hire an attorney, unless you know how to effectively represent yourself in court against a professional prosecutor intending to convict. He will try to get a dismissal, diversion, reduction or other decent outcome through plea bargain, or take it to trial if appropriate. Keep in mind a little free advice: When arrested for DUI, whether alcohol or drugs, then upon release from jail or booking the defendant is given documents that include a notice that you have only ten days to file a request with DMV for a hearing on an appeal of an automatic one-year suspension of your license imposed by DMV. That is separate and runs consecutively with any suspension that may be imposed by the court. Contact DMV and do so, timely, then appear at your scheduled DMV appeal hearing and present any supporting evidence and testimony. If you don't know how to do these things, then hire an attorney that does. If serious about hiring counsel to help in this, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me. The general rule is: Records are forever. However, you can consider getting the conviction expunged; which would help in obtaining and keeping employment. Many convictions, including your DUI, can be 'expunged' from criminal records by proper application and Petition to the court, but only if there was no felony prison time sentenced whether served or not, and if it was not for certain listed Sexual and Domestic Violence crimes, and if all terms of sentencing and at least one year of probation are completed, and if there are no new charges pending. If successful, the conviction would be retroactively reduced to a misdemeanor, if necessary, and then withdrawn and the charges dismissed. Expungement does not clear, 'remove' or erase the conviction, but merely changes the record to show 'conviction reversed and dismissed by expungement'. When applying for a job in the private sector, you generally do not have to disclose a conviction if it was expunged. However, the conviction is still a 'prior' or 'strike' for purposes of repeat offense, and must be disclosed on any application for government and professional employment and licensing, bonding, security clearance, etc. The licensing agency and employer then can decide whether you are barred from licensing or employment because of the conviction. If youre serious about doing this, and you think you qualify under those rules, feel free to contact me for the legal help you'll need.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/18/2011
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
You always should get your record expunged when you become eligible. If so you can answer no to the question of whether you have been convicted of any crime.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/18/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    You cannot get a DUI sealed or expunged unless it is over ten years ago. If you are asking about a juvenile ADUI then that will be sealed when you turn eighteen and no employers can access that record.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/18/2011
    Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller
    Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller | Thomas Mueller
    How it will affect your future employability is up to the individual firm. It certainly is feasible that, all other things being equal, an employer will let that be the deciding factor. It is a good idea to expunge the conviction. We find that a good lawyerin San Jose for expungements is
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/18/2011
    A.L.A. Law Group, LLP
    A.L.A. Law Group, LLP | Lauren M. Mayfield
    Employers often take alcohol and drug related offenses into consideration when making hiring decisions. Having a DUI on your record will be particularly problematic if your job requires any sort of driving, especially if it is an employer owned vehicle. You can get the court case expunged from your record once you have completed probation. To do so though it is very important that you pay all your fines, complete all of your classes and do not violate probation by drinking with a measurable amount of alcohol in your system or by getting another case while on probation. If you violate probation or fail to complete a requirement of your sentence it will be very difficult to expunge your DUI. Sealing your record is extremely difficult and rare and only occurs in the most extreme circumstances. If you cannot wait until the end of your probation period to expunge your DUI you can apply for early termination of probation once all of the classes and fines have been taken care of and you have served the majority of your probation. If you wish to do this you should speak with an attorney about filing a motion for early termination of probation and your expungement.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
    It depends. If you're future employment involves a position where you will be driving, a DUI is extremely negative. You can get a DUI expunged after you've finished probation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
    San Diego DUI Law Center
    San Diego DUI Law Center | Rick Mueller
    It really depends on the job.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    It certainly not mandatory for you to get an expungement generally speaking, but it can be helpful when applying for jobs. It depends on what type of work you may be doing in the future, and if having a DUI conviction on your record will be a deciding factor by a future employer. Based on your question, I recommend that you try to get your DUI expunged. This is a process that is handled through the Court. I regularly handle expungements.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
    Robert Mortland
    Robert Mortland | Law Office of Robert Mortland
    The DUI will appear on your record for 10 years and will be priorable for those 10 years. If an employer does a background check, this will show up.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Of course it will. That is why it is always a good idea not to get a DUI conviction in the first place. If you already have a DUI, then you must wait until probation is over before you are eligible for expungement.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Paul Wallin
    First of all unless you are convicted of a DUI it should not impact your employment. If you are convicted of the DUI it can affect your employment in many ways. If your job involves driving, your employer may fire you because of the conviction. If your drivers license is suspended due to the DUI and you need to drive for your job that would be bad. In addition, you may lose your car insurance if found guilty of a DUI and you cant legally drive without car insurance. At the end of your probationary period (3 to 5 years depending upon the court) you can retain a lawyer to make a motion to expunge your record. However, that will still not shield the information if you have a state license or work in the government. The best answer to your question is to do all you can to try to avoid the conviction in the first place so these consequences do not occur.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    a DUI is one of the very few (and maybe the only) thing you cannot get expunged and it stays on your record forever. Ifyou pick up another DUI in ten years from the date of the last one it counts as a Second and hasseriousconsequences so please don'tdrink and drive.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/16/2011
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