How to transfer lost car title of a deceased person? 27 Answers as of January 15, 2013

My mother recently passed. She owned a 1991 car & the title is missing. How do I transfer the car from her name to mine? The car is the only thing of value she owned.

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DOUGLAS A. TULL, P.C.
DOUGLAS A. TULL, P.C. | Douglas A. Tull
Take death certificate and proof of your relationship with your mother - to the Secretary of State- and explain that title is missing. If there are no other assets to probate, you may be able to transfer title to the "next of kin" without starting probate.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 1/15/2013
LAW OFFICE OF ROBERT I LONG
LAW OFFICE OF ROBERT I LONG | Robert I. Long
In California, the DMV has a form for transfer of a vehicle where there will not be any probate.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/11/2013
Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski
Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski | Gerald A. Bagazinski
The Michigan motor vehicle code has a mechanism to allow you to transfer the title. Bring the paid funeral bill to the Secretary of State Office near you.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 1/11/2013
Law Office Of Victor Waid
Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
Go to Dept of Motor Vehicles and they can help you with the documents needed to transfer the title to the car.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/8/2013
Irsfeld, Irsfeld & Younger LLP | Norman H. Green
Auto club or DMV can assist you with this.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/8/2013
    The Curran Law Firm
    The Curran Law Firm | Maura Curran
    You can contact the department of motor vehicles to get a replacement title. You will need some documentation to transfer to your name, ie, probate approval.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Law Offices of Frances Headley | Frances Headley
    The estate representative can apply for a duplicate title from the DMV.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C.
    Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C. | Brian Haggerty
    DMV has an Affidavit of Heirship form; you'll also probably have to file for a lost title.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Sebby Law Office
    Sebby Law Office | Jayne Sebby
    Contact the nearest state Department of Motor Vehicles office and ask them what procedure to follow.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    David T. McAndrew, Attorney at Law | David T. McAndrew
    The Secretary of State permits a family member to transfer a vehicle with a value less than $60,000 by filing an affidavit, (a form they provide), to the family member who the car would belong to, as long as a probate estate has not been opened.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    The Legal Center | Richard Manwaring
    If you are with AAA you can ask their assistance. If not go to the DMV and complete what is called a quarter sheet to transfer the automobile.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Law Office of Pamela Braynon | Pamela Y. Braynon
    If the car is worth less than $7,000 dollars you can present to the court "Disposition without administration" and the judge will give you the necessary order to present to the DOT to transfer the title of the car to you.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Law Offices of Charles R. Perry
    Law Offices of Charles R. Perry | Charles R. Perry
    Go to the DMV and explain the situation to them. The DMV can give you the necessary forms that you must fill out to re-register the car. Note that you will need documentation to show that your mother has passed away. You may also have to establish your right to the car but the DMV should give you an instruction form that tells you what you need. Best of luck to you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    James Law Group
    James Law Group | Christine James
    Go to the DMV with a death certificate.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Woolley Wilson, LLP
    Woolley Wilson, LLP | William R. Wilson
    check the DPS website
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Lampton Law Firm LLC | Norman Lampton
    You must apply to MO DOR for a lost title. The form is on their web site.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Law Office of Edward M. Burgh, APC | Edward M. Burgh
    Call the DMV and ask them how to transfer it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
    Go with death certificate, plate number, your id to secretary of state.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Edward L. Armstrong, P.C. | Edward L. Armstrong
    You need to request a duplicate title from the Missouri Department of Revenue. In order to transfer the title after you get it you must open an estate in the probate Division of the circuit court in the county where your mother was living when she died. You will either have to have a full administration or some form of abbreviated procedure. You need to retain a Missouri attorney to help you with this.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Martinson & Beason, PC
    Martinson & Beason, PC | Douglas C Martinson II
    Go to the license Dept in your County and get a lost Title Form. They should also have an Affidavit regarding her estate for you to sign so you can get the car without probating the estate.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Dara Goldsmith
    If the Decedent's estate is valued at under $20,000 and all debts have been paid you can probably complete an affidavit od entitlement at the DMV.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Elniski Law, P.C. | Keliann Elniski
    The executor/trix can send in the letters of administration to the DMV and request a copy. That person also has the authority to sign and transfer, but only insofar as the will provides. the executor/trix can fill out a form online through the DMV. Print it and send in with the LOA.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    The Law Offices of Laurie E. Ohall, P.A.
    The Law Offices of Laurie E. Ohall, P.A. | Laurie E. Ohall
    The Department of Motor Vehicles has a procedure for transferring title, without a probate, if no estate is being opened, even if you have lost the title. If you are the only child, it should not be hard to transfer. If you have siblings, they will need to consent to the transfer to you. I am sorry for your loss.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    O'Keefe Legal Services, L.L.C.
    O'Keefe Legal Services, L.L.C. | Sean P. O'Keefe
    In Maryland, you will likely need to open your mother's estate (contact Register of Wills office in her county of residence) so the personal representative can go to a full-service MVA office to request (apply for) a duplicate certificate of title. If the car was jointly titled, then the co-owner may make the request (application) with a death certificate.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Winnick Ruben Hoffnung Peabody & Mendel, LLC | Daniel N. Hoffnung
    Ask clerk of probate court.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    Take the death certificate to the Department of Transportation along with the title. You may need to prove you are her only child. They may transfer it based on that.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 1/8/2013
    Frederick & Frederick PLC | James P Frederick
    Unfortunately, you will likely need to pay to have a new title issued for your mother and then a transferred title to you. As long as you are the next of kin and there is no other need for probate, the car would not need to go through probate, as long as the value is less than $60k. You would go to the Secretary of State, provide them a certified copy of the death certificate and a copy of the registration, pay the fees and submit a Certificate form. You will also need to show proof of insurance. You probably do not need an attorney to help you with this.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/8/2013
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