How much time served for hit and run? 43 Answers as of July 03, 2013

Some people were injured.

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Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law
Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law | Jonathan S. Willett
The maximum is 90 days in jail and a $300 fine.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 7/19/2011
LynchLaw
LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
What you are referring to is a violation of Vehicle Code section 20001. The charge could be filed as a misdemeanor or a felony. If charged as a misdemeanor the maximum sentence is one year in county jail. Charged as a straight felony, the maximum sentence could be three years in prison. If however the injuries result in permanent or serious injury the maximum sentence could be four years in prison. Permanent or serious injury means the loss or permanent impairment of function of a bodily member or organ.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/16/2011
Bloom Legal, LLC
Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
This will depend specifically upon the severity of the accident, the number of injured parties, the extent of their injuries, etc. As a general rule, the penalties for a hit and run driving conviction in Louisiana are as follow: -When no death or 'serious bodily injury' occur: Jail time of 10 days - 6 months; Fines of up to $500 -When death or 'serious bodily injury' result: Jail time of up to 10 years and/or Fines of up to $5,000 Due to the potentially extremely serious penalties upon conviction if you believe you are facing criminal charges for hit and run driving, it would be advisable to contact an experienced local criminal defense attorney to begin work on your case immediately.
Answer Applies to: Louisiana
Replied: 7/15/2011
Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
I would need much more details as the amount of sentence varies depending upon the facts and circumstances, whether you plead guilty or are convicted after a trial etc.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 7/19/2011
Law Office of Richard Williams
Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
Hit and run with injuries is a clas C felony. The punishment for a class c felony is incarceration for not less than one year and one day nor more than ten (10) years, provided that you have no prior felony offenses. The fine for a class C felony is up to $15,000, and you will be required to pay restitution. Your driving privileges will be suspended possibily indefinitely.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 7/15/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    You ave not provided me with enough information to give you an accurate accessment of your case. You should retain an experienced criminal attorney to repentant you. If they were seriously hurt you will do a year or more in jail or even a state prison term.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Frances R. Johnson
    Frances R. Johnson | Frances R. Johnson
    It depends on the circumstances, and the person's criminal history. Consult an attorney with the specific facts of your situation.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    Hit & Run charges are usually class A misdemeanor charges which could result in jail up to 12 months and fines up to $2500. The actual sentence you receive is determined by the Judge.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Since it will likely be charged as a felony because of injuries, you face potentially between one to four years in state prison. Youll learn the actual charge[s] filed against you when you appear for arraignment at your first court hearing. When arrested or charged with any crime, the proper questions are, can any evidence obtained in a test, search or confession be used against you, and can you be convicted, and what can you do? No amount of free 'tips and hints' from here or anywhere else are going to effectively help you in your defense. A little free advice: exercise the 5th Amendment right to SHUT UP and do NOT talk to anyone except an attorney about the case. Raise all possible defenses with whatever admissible and credible witnesses, evidence and facts are available for legal arguments, for evidence suppression or other motions, or at trial. You can hire an attorney, unless you know how to effectively represent yourself in court against a professional prosecutor intending to convict. He will try to get a dismissal, diversion, reduction or other decent outcome through plea bargain, or take it to trial if appropriate. If serious about hiring counsel to help in this, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me. Ill be happy to help use whatever defenses there may be. Terry A. Nelson Attorney at Law 2134 Main St. #130 Huntington Beach, CA 92646 (714) 960-7584 email lawyer@surfcity.net Privileged And Confidential Communication. The information contained in this document is intended solely for use by the intended recipient[s]. This electronic transmission, and any documents attached hereto, (a) are protected by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (18 USC 2510-2521), (b) may contain privileged and confidential information including information which may be protected by the attorney-client and/or attorney work product privileges. If you have received this electronic message in error, please notify the sender and delete the electronic message. Any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the contents of the information received in error is strictly prohibited.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    We recommend you retain a criminal lawyer ASAP. No one can predict how much time you might serve, but you need a lawyer. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    You need to retain counsel and we can represent you.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Subin
    Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
    For someone who has no prior felonies, the standard range sentence is 3 to 9 months in jail for injury hit and run.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Anderson & Carnahan
    Anderson & Carnahan | Stephen Anderson
    You should talk to an attorney, I would be glad to discuss your options.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner | Roianne Houlton Conner
    Is the charge Hit and Run, Leaving the Scene of an Accident or were you charged with Assault because someone was hurt? The sentences for these charges range from 1 year to 20 years, it depends on the charge.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    That depends on that facts. Minordamage wth no injuries to anyone would max out at one year in county jail. sHowever, most likely that would end up as three years summery probation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Pontrello Law
    Pontrello Law | William Pontrello
    Depends on your record and the extent of your injuries.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/3/2013
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Michael J. Kennedy
    It depends on how many victims, how badly injured, what your record is, and what the details of the incident are. Hit and run with injury is a felony and requires careful and knowledgeable treatment. Don't go mucking around by yourself, because you will say or do things that cannot be undone.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/15/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    It would depend on the extent of the injury. Serious impairment of a body function or death is a 5 year felony; pesonal injury is a 1 year misdemeanor; just damage to a vehicle is a misdemeanor.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    LSA or leaving the scene is a misdemeanor, however, with injury it is a felony. Speak to no one but your lawyer, and depending on your facts you may be found not guilty or receive probation. Stay well.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    It's hard to say. It depends on whether you have a record and your circumstances in life, the details of the accident and the severity of the injuries, whether you can pay any restitution, and many other factors. A good attorney will play up whatever mitigating factors there are and downplay the aggravating ones. In the end, the result could possibly be no jail at all.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Leyba Defense, PLLC
    Leyba Defense, PLLC | Matthew Leyba
    There are 2 kinds of hit/run charges. The first is hit/run with an occupied vehicle. The second is hit/run of an unoccupied vehicle or some other kind of property. Hit/Run of an occupied vehicle carries a 1 year drivers license suspension, and carries a maximum penalty of 365 days in jail and a $5000 fine. Hit/Run of an unoccupied vehicle carries no license suspension, and a maximum penalty of 90 days in jail and a $1000 fine. If you're charged with this offense you should probably speak with an experienced Attorney who has dealt with these types of cases before. There are lots of different options that could result in the charge ultimately being dismissed.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    It depends on how much they were injured. It could be a number of years in prison. It all depends on the circumstances and what exactly one is charged with.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Smith & John
    Smith & John | Kenneth Craig Smith, Jr.
    Anything from probation to 6 months. It is solely up to the judge.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC | Raymond J. Savoy
    This depends on your prior record and the severity of the injuries. The court makes the final decision on jail time.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    No way to answer this without lots more information. I suggest contacting a lawyer to tell them the full story and get their take on it.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    It all depends on the severity of the injuries. The worse the injury then the harsher the penalty.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    Sec. 550.021. ACCIDENT INVOLVING PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH. (a) The operator of a vehicle involved in an accident resulting in injury to or death of a person shall: (1) immediately stop the vehicle at the scene of the accident or as close to the scene as possible; (2) immediately return to the scene of the accident if the vehicle is not stopped at the scene of the accident; and (3) remain at the scene of the accident until the operator complies with the requirements of Section 550.023. (b) An operator of a vehicle required to stop the vehicle by Subsection (a) shall do so without obstructing traffic more than is necessary. (c) A person commits an offense if the person does not stop or does not comply with the requirements of this section. An offense under this section: (1) involving an accident resulting in death of or serious bodily injury, as defined by Section 1.07, Penal Code, to a person is a felony of the third degree; and (2) involving an accident resulting in injury to which Subdivision (1) does not apply is punishable by: (A) imprisonment in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice for not more than five years or confinement in the county jail for not more than one year; (B) a fine not to exceed $5,000; or (C) both the fine and the imprisonment or confinement. A third degree felony carries from 2 to 10 years in prison. A person who commits the act of failure to stop and render aid is eligible for probation.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    Since there were people in the car: sounds like a "hit and run attended. This is a gross misdemeanor, punishable by up to a year in jail and a $5,000.00 fine. If the matter is charged out as a "vehicular assault", this could be a felony and the penalties are far more severe.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    The answer would depend on many things including the particular facts of the case related to the accident, injuries or damage caused.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum | Edward J. Blum
    VC 20001, hit and run with injury is a 'wobbler' that is, it is punishable as a misdemeanor with up to 1 year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine or as a felony with 16 months, 2 or 3 years and up to $10,000 fine as punishment. The actual time you would serve depends on the seriousness of the injuries and the county it occurred in.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    It depends on how badly they were injured. If you cause injury to another person, it's a one-year misdemeanor. If you cause serious injury to a person, that is a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Regardless of what crime you've been charged with, retain an experienced criminal attorney right away. If nothing else, at least have one review the police report in order to give you a better answer about your case and how to proceed and what the likely outcomes are.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    That depends on several factors you haven't given me. If the injuries were significant, you may be looking at felony Hit and Run. If the injuries don't involve serious injuries you would be looking at a gross misdemeanor. The felony sentencing would depend on your felony criminal history. The Gross Misdemeanor is punishable by 0 to 365 days in jail. What the judge will do in either case can't be predicted. However, the general practice is to give a person more time if he or she has a significant criminal history or if the defendant was also reckless or intoxicated at the time of the hit and run. The same is true if you were uninsured or your license was suspended. One thing I would do for sure is make sure that the injured peoples' medical bills are paid for. Otherwise, you will be ordered to pay restitution and that means long involvement with the probation department. And the courts are kind of like quicksand. Once you're in it's hard as hell to climb out.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    It really depends. Where, circumstances, your history, prosecutor, judge, court and defense lawyer all make a difference. It could be anywhere from nothing to state prison stand committed. Call a defense lawyer to thoroughly discuss you case.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Castleberry & Elison
    Castleberry & Elison | Peter Castleberry
    Under Oregon "hit and run" law, if you are in an accident that involved injury to a person, you could potentially be charged with Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver to Injured Persons (ORS 811.705). This crime is a class C felony which carries a maximum of 5 years in prison and a maximum $125,000 fine. If the accident involved "serious physical injury" to another, the crime can be charged as a class B felony which carries up to 10 years jail and a $250,000 fine. However, the statutory maximums for felonies can be very misleading and a person convicted of felony "hit and run" will not serve anywhere near the statutory maximum, even if sentenced by the harshest judge. In "hit and run" scenarios, the prosecutor may also choose to charge the crime of Reckless Driving, which is a class A misdemeanor.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    The Law Offices of Dustan Neyland
    The Law Offices of Dustan Neyland | Dustan Neyland
    It depends on a lot of factors. If someone was seriously injured or died, then it could be a 3rd degree felony charge of Failure to Stop and Render Aid and in that case the punishment range is probation or 2 to 10 years in prison. If no one was seriously injured or killed, then it would be a misdemeanor charge that could carry a punishment of probation or confinement in the county jail up to 180 days.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Paul Wallin
    If you are convicted of felony hit and run the sentencing options range from probation to a state prison sentence of up to three years in state prison. However, if there are serious injuries then you could be facing more serious punishment including a requirement that you make restitution to the victims.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    I would need more specifics. How many people injured? How serious were the injuries? Do you have any prior convictions? Were you on probation at the time of the incident?
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Law Office of Rodney Nosratabadi
    Law Office of Rodney Nosratabadi | Rodney Nosratabadi
    Depends on the extent of injuries. C
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    Depends on the severity of the injuries and the past criminal history as well as a lot of other factors. It is a serious offense and you should consult with and hire an attorney before doing anything rash.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    If a misdemeanor, the max is 6 months in county.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    There's no short answer just on those facts. The extent of the injuries, number of alleged victims and your prior record (if any) will matter. Hit and run with injury can be either a felony or a misdemeanor. Generally, the injury level dictates which way it's filed. There can be sentencing enhancements for great bodily injury if the injuries were substantial.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/14/2011
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann | Christopher J. McCann
    Hit & Run as a misdemeanor carries up to a year in jail. As a felony, it carries up to a year in jail, or 16 months, 2 years or 3 years in prison depending on the circumstances and your record.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/14/2011
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