How much time am I looking at with a Petty Theft with a Prior? 7 Answers as of March 28, 2011

I am running from a warrant 4 my arrest my bail is 110,000. My charge is Petty Theft W/Prior that happened in 2008. How much time do you think I am looking at with a $110.000 bail? Does it look better if I have my warrant recalled in front of judge?

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The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
Running from the warrant is not a good thing. Hire an attorney. Have him put your case on calendar. You appear and attorney argues for you to stsy ou. Warrant will remain out until either you arrested or appear in court. Attorney can get you into court faster than you can set case.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/28/2011
Law Office of Andrew Roberts
Law Office of Andrew Roberts | Andrew Stephen Roberts
Yes- you retain an attorney who could make the proper arrangements to turn you. It always looks better if you are pro-active in dealing with this, as opposed to getting picked up with a broken taillight and then the police finding the existing warrants. I have done this numerous times for clients. Call if you have any questions. The bail is irrelevant- but a bail bondsman will be made available if handled correctly.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/28/2011
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
The warrant can only be recalled by you appearing in front of a judge, even for a misdemeanor. The good news is that petty theft with a prior is still very small potatoes in the big picture. A good attorney could very well keep you from doing any jail time, although it depends completely on the specific facts of the case. Even your bail amount could change but you need an attorney's help.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/28/2011
Law Office of Jeff Yeh
Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
Whether a warrant is recalled or not does not affect the merits of the case. A warrant recall is simply a prerequisite for addressing the merits of the case. With that said, petty theft with a prior is a "wobbler," meaning it could be filed either as a misdemeanor or felony. So, you could be facing more than a year in state prison.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/28/2011
Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
For you to handle this, you must turn yourself into the court, with or without an attorney, and try to negotiate a plea bargain on the warrant, and on the outstanding charges. Doing so voluntarily will result in a better outcome than you being brought in cuffs to court after arrest on the warrant. The charge carries 6-12 months in jail, but also enhancements with your prior. While this isn't a 'capital case', you do face some potential jail and fines because of the prior, and the flight that got you the warrant, so handle it right. Unless you're competent to effectively represent yourself in court and be persuasive with a professional prosecutor trying to put you in jail, and a judge unhappy with you for flight, most people would hire an attorney who can defuse the situation a little. If you get serious about doing so, feel free to contact me if the court is in SoCal.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/28/2011
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman | Gabriel Dorman
    Petty theft with a prior conviction is a felony offense punishable by up to 16 months or 2 years or 3 years in prison. The fact that you have a warrant for your arrest will only serve to aggravate the case. The amount of bail on the warrant says absolutely nothing about the potential consequences for your case. Your only option is to immediately contact an experienced criminal defense attorney to fully and properly evaluate all the circumstances involving your case in order to best determine the potential consequences and the best way to handle the matter. I would further caution you against attempting to recall the warrant without a lawyer as this could very well result in your being taken into custody at that time. I hope this answer was helpful. Good luck to you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/28/2011
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