How much money can I get in my divorce? 16 Answers as of June 09, 2011

I have been divorced for 2 years and he said I can have the alimony money as I have never worked but now he saying he wants half of it can he still do that after 2 years. Thanks.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
He would have to demonstrate a "material change" in the circumstances to justify a modification of the judgment of divorce. Stay well.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 6/9/2011
Law Office of James Lentz
Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
In Ohio and Michigan, what was decided as your final judgment is what you have. It can be modified only due to fraud. Consult your divorce attorney for further information.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 6/9/2011
Law Office of Patricia Van Haren
Law Office of Patricia Van Haren | Patricia Van Haren
The amount of alimony that you would receive would depend on what the current orders are in your divorce. If your former husband wishes to change the amount of support you are receiving, he would need to petition the court for a modification of support in order to lower it.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/8/2011
Arnold & Wadsworth
Arnold & Wadsworth | Brian Arnold
Depends on if you have a final divorce decree. You need to get it in a divorce decree manner or in a stipulated agreement.
Answer Applies to: Utah
Replied: 6/8/2011
Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
This question cannot be answered in a vacuum. What does your order say? Was this a marriage of long duration or was it a short marriage? Have there been a change of circumstances? Without more information, it would be improper to answer this question. If you are in my area and are looking for an attorney, please contact me for a free consultation and I may be able to answer your questions after speaking with you further about your specific case.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/8/2011
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A.
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A. | Joanna Mitchell
    I am not quite sure what you are asking. Is he trying to modify an existing alimony award that was ordered in the final judgment? He can only do that if he petitions the court and if there is a substantial change in circumstances that warrants the modification. If he simply "chooses" to reduce the payment, then he would be in contempt of the prior order. Hope that answers your question. If not, feel free to inquire further.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    Your question as posted does not make sense. Alimony is set in the divorce, not two years later. Your answer as to what alimony there is, if any, is in your divorce papers, as is whether the amount can or cannot be changed.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Your inquiry is unclear. Whether spousal support is paid depends entirely on what was included in your court order for a dissolution of marriage.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Wolverine Law | Stuart Collis
    I presume that this is a second marriage by the tenor of the question but your question is very unclear. Your new spouse has no entitlement to alimony that you obtained from a divorce from a prior spouse.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law | John Kirchner
    If there is a court order requiring him to pay alimony, it will take another court order to change it. If there is no court order requiring him to pay something, then he legally free to do what he wants. If you did not get court ordered alimony when you were divorced 2 years ago, you probably can't get it now.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP | Christine Gonilla
    Your question is unclear. However if there is an order for alimony he must comply with its terms until it is modified.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Fox Law Firm LLC
    Fox Law Firm LLC | Tina Fox
    He has to pay you the amount that the judge ordered in your final dissolution. If he is not paying that amount we can petition the court on your behalf. If you would like us to look into this case for you in more detail, please provide a copy of the final dissolution and contact the office today.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Seattle Divorce Services
    Seattle Divorce Services | Michael V. Fancher
    Under Washington law, if your divorce decree awards you alimony, then that is yours and your ex cannot take it away. He could go back to court to try and modify the decree, but that is not successful very often.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Glenn E. Tanner
    Glenn E. Tanner | Glenn E. Tanner
    He has to do what's in the divorce decree. Maintenance (it's not called alimony in Washington) is modifiable however. But you are entitled, unless it is modified to what's in your decree of dissolution.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Beresford Booth PLLC
    Beresford Booth PLLC | S. Scott Burkhalter
    I am not sure I understand your question. Property and debts are divided fairly and equitably in Washington State. Spousal maintenance is determined primarily on a need and ability basis.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler
    Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler | Robert L Fiedler
    The terms of the divorce agreement or judgment control. If you have been divorced for 2 years already, 2 years ago that decision was made. If the divorce has you getting alimony, you get it. If it doesn't have you getting it, you don't.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/8/2011
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney