How many years does a district attorney have to prosecute a California correctional officer in a criminal prison case? 7 Answers as of February 03, 2011

How many years does a district attorney have to prosecute a California correctional officer in a criminal prison case?

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Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
That depends upon whether it is a felony or misdemeanor. A misdemeanor would be filed within a year. A Felony Would be filed within three years.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/3/2011
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
The statute of limitations for such a crime in the California state courts is three years.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/2/2011
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
It depends on what the alleged crime was. Some acts have longer statutes of limitation than others, some statutes of limitation do not begin to rum=n until the crime is discovered. Whether or not a potential defendant is a correctional officer , any other state or municipal employee makes no difference.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/1/2011
The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
It would be dependant upon the crime. Most felonies are three years and misdemeanors are one year.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/31/2011
Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
Just as with any other person, it depends upon the specific crime alleged. SOL varies from a year for misdemeanors, to as much as 3 6 years on felonies, except murder has no statute. If it is you facing criminal charges, consult with an attorney immediately. If you are trying to press charges, you have an uphill fight to get the police and DA to do so against another govt / law enforcement agent. I wouldnt hold my breath on that happening, unless you have really incontrovertible evidence of a crime. d.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/31/2011
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    It depends on the charge. The statute of limitations on most misdemeanors is one year from the date of the offense. On most felonies, it's three years from the date of the offense. There are some exceptions for fraud, life crimes and sex crimes, but those are the typical time frames. The statue of limitations deals with how long the prosecution has to file charges. How long they take to conclude is another story.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/31/2011
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