How long will someone go to jail for if they are caught for criminal trespassing in Arizona? 2 Answers as of January 04, 2011

What is the amount of time in jail or prison that someone who is charged for trespassing will have to serve?

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Jackson White, PC
Jackson White, PC | Jeremy Geigle
Criminal trespass in Arizona can be charged as a misdemeanor of a felony depending on the circumstances of the case. Maximum jail time for criminal trespass can be as little as 30 days or as much as 6 months if it is charged as a misdemeanor. If the case is charged as a felony, you could be sentenced up to 2 years in prison if there are aggravating factors present. Entering or remaining unlawful on someone else's property may not seem like a huge deal, but when you consider the potential consequences if it is reported and charged as a crime, it can be a big deal.
Answer Applies to: Arizona
Replied: 1/4/2011
Kielsky Rike, PLLC
Kielsky Rike, PLLC | Michael Kielsky
Criminal trespass can be of the first, second, or third degree, each degree being more serious than the following. First degree is typically for criminal trespass at a home, second degree is typically for criminal trespass at a commercial location, and third degree is typically at unimproved land. Criminal trespass in the first degree may be a class 6 felony or class 1 misdemeanor. Criminal trespass in the second and third degree are class 2 and class 3 misdemeanors, repectively.

A class 6 felony may be punished by between 4 months to 2 years in prison, plus fines up to $150,000. A class 1 midemeanor may be punished by up to 6 months in jail and up to $2,500 in fines. A class 2 midemeanor may be punished by up to 4 months in jail and up to $750 in fines. A class 3 misdemeanor may be punished by up to 30 days in jail and up to $500 in fines. These are all the maximum penalties, the actual penalties are likely to be far less, depending on the facts, but not always.

This answer is a general statement of law, did not and could not consider all details of your situation, should not be relied upon as legal advice, does not create an attorney/client relationship.
Answer Applies to: Arizona
Replied: 12/23/2010
Click to View More Answers: