How long does a grand jury have to indict you after a criminal charge? 21 Answers as of July 08, 2013

If you've been arrested, charged with a crime and bound over to the Grand Jury. How long do they have to indict you?

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Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
If you are charged with a felony, the grand jury must indict the case so that the felony court retains jurisdiction. This must occur within the statute of limitations which varies by the type of offense.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 10/24/2011
Law Office of Richard Williams
Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
Usually, within a reasonable period of time, but not to exceed the applicable statute of limitations.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 10/20/2011
Healan Law Offices
Healan Law Offices | William D. Healan, III
Generally it is two years for a misdemeanor and four years for a felony, but there are lots of exceptions. Also, for a lot a charges, the prosecutor can just file an accusation instead of getting a grand jury indictment.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 10/20/2011
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
You should be asking your attorney these questions. There is a statute of limitations applicable to each type of crime. Some , such as sex crime and fraud cases, can be extended. Others, like murder, have no statute of limitations. The DA has the length of the statute of limitations to obtain the indictment. That does not mean that there aren't other limitations such as jeopardy which may also be applicable.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/20/2011
Law Office of Charles J. Block
Law Office of Charles J. Block | Charles J. Block
Depending on the degree of the crime will determine the amount of time it will take to indict you but in this matter, I believe it will probably be within the next month to six weeks.
Answer Applies to: New Jersey
Replied: 10/20/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    It depends on several things, such as when the case was presented to the jury and whether the defendant is in jail or not.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    If you are not indicted within 90 days of arrest, you are entitled to a PR bond, if you already made bond (paid, posted, or PR) the Grand Jury has until the Statute of Limitations expires.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law | Jonathan S. Willett
    The statute of limitations is five years for most federal offenses, three years for most state offenses. The federal and state grand juries are impaneled for a specific period of time; however, if they do not reach a conclusion on your case, the prosecutor can start over with the newly impaneled grand jury.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    90 days is my memory though it could be 60 days. A dismissal is without prejudice which means state can refile charge by grand jury.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    You will either be indicted by a "true bill" or the Grand Jury will return a "no true bill" and the case will be dismissed within 45 days. You are charged with a felony. You should retain a good criminal attorney to get the best possible results under the circumstances.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Law Office of Daniel K Martin
    Law Office of Daniel K Martin | Daniel K Martin
    There its not enough info, is it state or federal?
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/8/2013
    Law Offices of Kenneth Wincorn P.C.
    Law Offices of Kenneth Wincorn P.C. | Kenneth Wincorn
    The general answer is the present term. There are exceptions though.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    If you have demanded trial in the case, the prosecution has 160 days to proceed to trial, if they do not proceed to trial, the charges can be dismissed. However, you must have registered a written demand for trial before this law becomes effective for you. If you have done nothing, I would advise hiring an attorney to get the matter before a judge so a proper demand for trial can be effectuated.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 10/19/2011
    bark & karpf
    bark & karpf | peter bark
    Once you are arrested, the prosecution has six months to announce readiness for trial. If you are charged with a felony, they can wait until the six months is almost up. You will then obtain an indictment and announce ready for trial once the indictment is handed down. So in effect, they have almost six months to indict.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/19/2011
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law | Gary Moore
    The statute of limitations for most indictable offenses is five years. There is an effort to reduce delays in grand jury presentation, but it consists of technically dismissing the case, but retaining the conditions of bail. You need to deal with this problem because you need to identify witnesses and their addresses; get statements from witnesses; and otherwise preserve evidence which may not be available later.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 10/19/2011
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law | Mark Thiessen
    No set time limit. They are presented the case when the DA is ready to hand them the case. It's up to the DA to present the case to the GJ.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 10/19/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    The statute of limitations is five years for all criminal charges. So, the time from the commission of the offense to charging must be within the five year period. There are no other limits placed upon the charging entity.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 10/19/2011
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    You don't get bound over to the Grand Jury, you get bound over to Superior Court. The prosecutor has the statute of limitations time period to present the case to the Grand Jury, which is typically four years for a regular felony and seven years for a serious felony.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/19/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    We recommend you hire a criminal attorney ASAP. Generally, it varies from county to county, and depends upon a number of factors, but, theoretically, the state can take all the time it needs, up until the statute of limitations runs. See a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/19/2011
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