How long do the state has to arraign me after I post bail? 18 Answers as of October 02, 2012

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Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
In Michigan 14 days.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 10/2/2012
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
Call the court and find out what your next court date is. If they do not know then call back every few days.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/27/2012
Steven Alpers | Steven Alpers
3 years if it is a felony and 1 year if it is a misdemeanor.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/26/2012
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
This time frame can vary depending upon circumstances and the jurisdiction.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 9/24/2012
Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
You were given a court hearing date when you were released upon posting bail. That is your arraignment date. If you don't think so, go back and look at your paperwork, and call your bail bondsman to confirm the date. If you don't know how to represent yourself effectively against an experienced prosecutor intending to convict, then hire an attorney who does, who will try to get a dismissal, charge reduction, diversion, programs, or other decent outcome through motions, plea bargain, or take it to trial if appropriate.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/24/2012
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Normally, a reasonable time. It could be several weeks following the indictment being returned. I suggest you call the Clerk's office in the county where you were indicted and they will likely have an arraignment date for you.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Law Office of Jared C. Winter
    Law Office of Jared C. Winter | Jared C. Winter
    If you posted bail after your arrest, then you won't be arraigned until the DA files charges. In some cases, the DA does not file charges right away. In fact, sometimes they don't ever file charges. As long as they file charges within the statue of limitations, there is no issue. The statute of limitations varies and depends upon the charge they file. You will be notified by mail when they file. In the meantime, do NOT call the DA's office to find out when they are going to file. You have no obligation to follow up on this and it is foolish to call them and remind them that they need to prosecute you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD
    Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD | Mace Yampolsky
    After you are out they have up to 5 yr. for a felony and up to 1 yr for a misdemeanor.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A | R. Jason de Groot
    It is usually within a reasonable time, 6 weeks perhaps.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
    Ask a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    Your question is I believe...How long does the state have to arraign me on the felony in Supreme Court after I have posted bail. When you are arrested on a felony you are arraigned within 24-48 hours in a local criminal court. The bail is set at that time. If it is a felony and you are in jail the prosecutor has 5 days to indict you by Grand Jury. The can also run a felony hearing. Then you are arraigned in Supreme Court on the indictment and bail can be changed. If you are out of jail they have a year before the case will be placed on a reserve calendar in Part F in Manhattan, but other courts have their own way to deal with case that are not indicted. Eventually the lawyer can move to have the case dismissed if it is not indicted.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/24/2012
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