How does bankruptcy impact me as a renter? 13 Answers as of May 02, 2011

I have claimed bankruptcy this year, and I know that people who own properties usually lose their homes to pay off as much debt as possible. Since I am a renter, what is going to happen to me next? What can I do?

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Mercado & Hartung, PLLC
Mercado & Hartung, PLLC | Christopher J. Mercado
BK will have a negative impact on your credit. If you go to rent another place, the landlord may ask to see your credit before deciding whether to rent the place to you.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 5/2/2011
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
First, people who file bankruptcy do not usually lose their homes to pay debts. Second, nothing is going to happen to you. If your bankruptcy is over, it is over. If your case is still open and the trustee is asking you questions about your assets, get a lawyer now. That is a sign something is not right.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/27/2011
Burnham & Associates
Burnham & Associates | Stephanie K. Burnham
It appears that you are mistaken as to what happens to people when they file Bankruptcy. Not all home owners lose their homes, and in your case since you do not own real estate, so long as you pay your rent, nothing should happen to you.
Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
Replied: 4/27/2011
Benson Law Firm
Benson Law Firm | David Benson
It is very often not necessary to relinquish a home in bankruptcy, whether a purchase or a rental. Your rental agreement should have been listed in your schedules and you should have decided whether to reject the lease or affirm it.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 4/27/2011
The Law Offices of Alan M. Laskin
The Law Offices of Alan M. Laskin | Jared B. Gaynor
First off - what you think you know is incorrect. In this day and age, the VAST majority of people do not lose their homes in bankruptcy (to pay off debts) - they lose the property because they can no longer afford to pay for it. For your situation, there should be little effect on your leased property, as long as you stay current on your lease payments.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/28/2011
    The Law Offices of Benjamin C. Tiller, Esq.
    The Law Offices of Benjamin C. Tiller, Esq. | Benjamin Tiller
    First of all, most people DON'T lose their homes when they file bankruptcy in Montana, you can protect $250,000.00 in equity in your primary residence. As for renters, as long as you are caught up on your rent when you file, and continue to make your post petition rent payments, you'll keep the roof over your head.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 4/28/2011
    Bankruptcy Law Office of Robert Weed
    Bankruptcy Law Office of Robert Weed | Robert Weed
    I'm not sure that people who own houses usually lose them. In my experience, they usually don't. The purpose of bankruptcy is to give you a new start in life and a clear field for the future. You need to start rebuilding your credit history. As soon as your bankruptcy is approved, get a small credit card you may have to pay a $139 fee to get a $300 credit card. Charge gasoline, pay it in full. After a while you'll start getting $500 card. Get a couple; charge gasoline; pay them in full. You are on your way back to good credit.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 4/28/2011
    Ferguson & Ferguson
    Ferguson & Ferguson | Randy W. Ferguson
    If I understand you, it should not affect you as a renter. Some companies might not rent to you.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 4/27/2011
    Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis
    Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis | Eric Lewis
    Most typically, bankruptcy does not affect a lease agreement as long as the tenant continues to make timely payments.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 4/27/2011
    Bankruptcy Law office of Bill Rubendall
    Bankruptcy Law office of Bill Rubendall | William M. Rubendall
    After a bankruptcy a renter has the same rights and responsibilities as someone who hasn't filed bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/27/2011
    Greifendorff Law Offices, PC
    Greifendorff Law Offices, PC | Christine Wilton
    You cannot be thrown out of your current apartment, but may have trouble renting elsewhere for a while.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/27/2011
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney