How do I properly evict a tenant who is in breach of land contract (60 days with no payment)? 13 Answers as of October 25, 2012

Land contract on my house, current tenant that signed land contract does not live there, she "sub-leased" my home to someone else, and they are 2 months late with payment, how do I evict them properly?

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Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
If you want it done properly, you should speak with an attorney and have the attorney handle the eviction.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/25/2012
Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski
Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski | Gerald A. Bagazinski
Send a notice of forfeiture and file a complaint for possession in District Court.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 10/24/2012
Casler Law Offices PLLC
Casler Law Offices PLLC | Carlton C. Casler
You need to initiate forfeiture proceedings, pursuant to ARS Section 33-741, et seq. You will need a real estate lawyer to help you with this matter. You need to do the forfeiture first and then evict the tenant.
Answer Applies to: Arizona
Replied: 10/24/2012
David J. Hutchinson Law Office
David J. Hutchinson Law Office | David J. Hutchinson
You need to file a Forfeiture Action in the District Court. It has a lot of technicalities. You should have a lawyer do it.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 10/24/2012
Fidelity National Title Insurance Company
Fidelity National Title Insurance Company | Andrew Capelli
You will need to foreclose on the land contract, which must be done in the district court where the property is located. You can seek eviction as part of the land contract foreclosure process. I would recommend hiring an attorney. Good luck!
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 10/24/2012
    Law Offices of Steven D. Urban
    Law Offices of Steven D. Urban | Steven D. Urban
    File an action for forcible detainer in your local justice of the peace court.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 10/24/2012
    Dunnings Law Firm
    Dunnings Law Firm | Steven Dunnings
    First you have to forfeit the land contract with the person who bought it.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/24/2012
    Winnick Ruben Hoffnung Peabody & Mendel, LLC | Daniel N. Hoffnung
    You must start by serving a Notice to Quit on all Tenants and Sub-Tenants If you are not hiring an attorney for this, you can get advice from the Clerk of the Housing Court in your jurisdiction.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 10/24/2012
    James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C.
    James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C. | James T. Weiner
    Send a 15 day notice of forfeiture.. addressed to the person who signed the lease and address a second one to tenant Then file an forfeiture action on the land contract to get the property back A land contract may have a 3 month or 6 month right of redemption so.. you may not get any $$ for a while.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/24/2012
    Powell Potter PLLC
    Powell Potter PLLC | Shawn Potter
    You would follow the same statutory eviction process as a regular eviction but you could also potentially sue your original tenant for damages as well.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 10/24/2012
    MatthewR. Schutz, Esq | Matthew R. Schutz
    Start by suing the tenants and sub tenants in L/T Court .
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 10/24/2012
    The Law Offices of Robert W. Bellamy
    The Law Offices of Robert W. Bellamy | Robert W. Bellamy
    Hire lawyer. This is a contract law issue and the agreement will dictate how you file in court.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 10/24/2012
    Yahima Suarez, A Law Firm, PL | YAHIMA SUAREZ
    To evict a non-paying tenant, the landlord must file an eviction action in court. Most courts provide with forms to file for eviction. However, it is recommended to have an attorney handle the process and assure it is done correctly. The lease, if there was one, must be reviewed to see the provisions regarding sub-lease of the premises. The above information is provided for informational purposes only and shall not be construed to constitute legal advice.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/24/2012
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