How do I know if I have a Califoria strike on my record? 9 Answers as of June 21, 2011

What crimes in California are deemed "Strikes" and how does one know whether or not they have one on their record?

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Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
If you know what you have been convicted of, go to an experienced certified criminal law specialist and he will tell you if any of your convictions are strikes.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/21/2011
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
Did you have an attorney? If so, you should contact that attorney.

There is a codified list of offenses that are deemed strikes, just Google it. However, whether or not your particular conviction was a strike is unique to your case. You would need to check the court files or at least at the criminal court clerk. An attorney could get this information you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/19/2010
Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller
Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller | Thomas Mueller
You may obtain your own criminal record either by requesting it at a local police agency or by writing to
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/19/2010
Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
Most serious and violent felonies count as Strikes. California Penal Code lists the felonies considered serious (at sec. 1192.7) or violent (at sec. 667.5) for the purposes of the Three-Strikes Law.

This is a partial list of crimes which count as a Strike:

Murder
Voluntary manslaughter
Mayhem (cutting off, disabling or disfiguring a body part)
Rape (including oral copulation or sodomy by force and "gang rape")
Assault
Selling, giving or attempting to sell drugs to a minor
Continuous sexual abuse of a child.
Lewd acts on a child under 14.
Kidnapping and taking hostages.
Robbery, bank robbery, home-invasion burglary, grand theft involving a firearm or extortion.
Threatening witnesses
Attempting or conspiring to commit any strike crime.
Any crime punishable by the death penalty or life in prison.
Any felony committed with a firearm.
Any felony that resulted in great bodily injury to a victim.

You may also have a strike if you have a: felony conviction from another state; federal felony conviction; juvenile adjudication from age 16 or older.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/19/2010
Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
There is a list of cases that result in strikes in the California Penal Code which is available on line. They are generally crimes of violence, assaults with injury, rapes, etc. You should go to the local police department, get your fingerprints taken and tell them you want your C I and I rap sheet. Then you ought to be able to figure it out.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/18/2010
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
    You should know if you have one. Contact your prior attorney to find out.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 11/18/2010
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    The easier way to answer this question is to find out what you are convicted of. You can call me to discuss in further detail.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 11/18/2010
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    If it was a violent felony. Contact an attorney to be sure.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 11/18/2010
    The English Law Firm
    The English Law Firm | Robert English
    Strike offenses in California are listed in the Penal Code. A prior conviction counts as strike for "three strikes law" purposes if it was for a serious or violent felony. "Serious felonies" are listed in California Penal Code Section 1192.7 (c), and "violent felonies" are listed in California Penal Code Section 667.5 (c). If you were convicted of one of the listed offenses, then you have a strike for each conviction.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 11/18/2010
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