How do I find out if I am being sued in small claims court? 19 Answers as of July 03, 2013

How can I find out it I am being sued in small claims court or in the process of same? I have heard a person can be served by mail and not know this until a judgment.

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Durflinger Oliver & Associates
Durflinger Oliver & Associates | James Edmund Oliver
Google Washington Courts. There is a name search function. Search for your name and it will show all of your court records.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 11/30/2011
Kelaher Law Offices, P.A.
Kelaher Law Offices, P.A. | James P Kelaher
Go over to the courthouse and ask a clerk in county court (small claims division) to check for you. While you should be personally served by a deputy or a process server, they can serve you by mail if they allege you're concealing your whereabouts. If you have lived at the same address and work at the same place for the last 6 or more months, if they get a judgment against you, you can probably get it declared void, if you can prove you never concealed your whereabouts.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 11/30/2011
Law Office of Mark J. Leonardo
Law Office of Mark J. Leonardo | Mark Leonardo
Most courts have a website that allows you to search cases by a party's name. Some charge for this, and some do not. You might call the court in the County you reside to see if they include small claims cases. In Los Angeles County they do. If you go to any court in the County, you can look online on their computer for free. You might even try calling the small claims clerk to see if they will look it up for you. You might get lucky and find a nice clerk that will actually do it on the phone but don't hold your breath on that one. If the case went forward without you being present, and a judgment was rendered against you, the court gives you 30 days to appeal. An appealed small claims case takes place in Superior Court. Either side may have an attorney represent them at that hearing and the case takes place as if it never happened before. So anything that happened or that was said at the small claims hearing, whether you were there or not, is completely irrelevant as the case starts afresh before the new judge (it will not be the same judge).
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/30/2011
Bernard Huff, Attorney/Mediator
Bernard Huff, Attorney/Mediator | Bernard Huff
You should receive official notice if you are being sued. However, if you are familiar with the Small Claims Court where the lawsuit may be brought, you should contact that Court.
Answer Applies to: Indiana
Replied: 11/30/2011
Wilson & Hajek, LLC
Wilson & Hajek, LLC | Eddie W. Wilson
Many jurisdictions have this information online. Use city or county name to search. If not available, call the clerk of the General District Court in the place you believe suit may exist.
Answer Applies to: Virginia
Replied: 11/30/2011
    Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A.
    Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A. | Paul L. Whitfield
    Clerk of court in your county keeps a docket by names of the parties. You can go to the courthouse or you may find this info online.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 11/30/2011
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
    Yes you can be served by mail. You should just go to the local county clerk and have them check your name and see if you are a named defendant in any recent lawsuits. They will have a record of it.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 11/30/2011
    Lombardi Law Firm
    Lombardi Law Firm | Steve Lombardi
    You call the court house, small claims division, give them your name and ask if there is a suit filed against you. Yes you can be served by mail.
    Answer Applies to: Iowa
    Replied: 11/30/2011
    Law Office of John C. Farrell, Jr.
    Law Office of John C. Farrell, Jr. | John C. Farrell, Jr.
    With any lawsuit before a judgment enters the defendant needs to be served and then given the opportunity to be heard.The methods of service for small claims court are a bit more relaxed but you still should receive notification of the lawsuit.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 11/30/2011
    Susan M. Hankins, P.C. | Susan M. Hankins
    Many courts have data bases that can be searched online. You may also contact the clerks office in the county where you think the action would be filed against you.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 11/30/2011
    Cary J. Wintroub & Associates
    Cary J. Wintroub & Associates | Cary J. Wintroub
    Assuming this is a Cook County matter you may get the answer by going to the Clerk's website and or visiting one of the court houses where you can run a search of your name and or the party bringing the action.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 11/30/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Check the court records.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/3/2013
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C.
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C. | Robert Kelly
    Basic civil procedure requires notice and an opportunity to be heard. The Washington Courts website has a search index where you can see if your name appears on any cases. (http://dw.courts.wa.gov/index.cfm?fa=home.home). "Small claims" actions should show up as District Court cases. If a judgment gets entered against you without your knowing about it, it can be grounds to have the judgment vacated.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 11/30/2011
    Park Law Offices LLC | Kevin Parks
    If you haven't been served with documentation, but you fear you may nonetheless be a party to a suit, you should simply call the courthouse, as they can search by name.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 11/30/2011
    Canty Law Firm
    Canty Law Firm | Timothy Canty
    Call the Clerk of the Court and ask. Some courts are online and you can check from your computer.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 11/29/2011
    Jakob-Barnes Law Firm, LLC
    Jakob-Barnes Law Firm, LLC | Jennifer Jakob-Barnes
    You can go to the Courthouse and have the clerk search under your name.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 11/29/2011
    Albert Law Group
    Albert Law Group | Alvin S. Albert
    Depending on your county, you will be able to locate the case online or merely by calling the clerk's office. The staff in the smaller/rural counties will readily take the time to search the database -if you have a plaintiff and defendant's name.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 11/29/2011
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