How can I turn myself in for a warrant? 12 Answers as of April 05, 2012

I want to turn myself in for a warrant.

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Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
Go to police department. Better if you get a lawyer to surrender you in court to avoid jail untill they finally get you to court.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/5/2012
Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
Turning yourself into a police station will simply get you arrested, jailed and transported to the court[s] in cuffs and an orange jump suit. To properly handle warrants, you must turn yourself into the issuing court, with or without an attorney, and try to negotiate a recall of the warrant. You'll try to negotiate bail reduction or OR release. You'll try to negotiate a plea bargain or take to trial the outstanding charges that caused the warrant. Turning yourself in voluntarily will result in a better outcome than being brought in cuffs to court after arrest on the warrant. That can happen if you come in contact with law enforcement or customs anywhere in the US. On felony charges, the defendant must be personally present at every court hearing and appearance. On misdemeanors and infractions, the attorney can appear in court without the defendant being present, and any plea bargain deal could be handled by notarized paperwork. While this isn't a 'capital case', you face potential jail and fines, so handle it right. Effective plea-bargaining, using whatever legal defenses, facts and sympathies there may be, could possibly keep you out of jail/prison, or at least dramatically reduce it. Unless you're competent to effectively represent yourself in court against a professional prosecutor trying to put you in jail, most people hire an attorney who can.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/5/2012
Law Offices of George Woodworth & Associates
Law Offices of George Woodworth & Associates | George Woodworth
Go see an Attorney first! Some misdemeanor matters could be handled by an Attorney without you going to court. Felony matters always require your court appearance but again an Attorney may be able to smooth the way so that you can resolve the case when you come to court, or the Attorney can set up bail for your quick release, and later disposition of the case.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/5/2012
Law Office of Edward J. Blum
Law Office of Edward J. Blum | Edward J. Blum
Show up at the clerks office, usually before 9 am and they will put case on courts calendar. You should show up with a lawyer.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/4/2012
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
Call the sheriff; appear in the lobby of the jail. Better might be to call a bondsman and make arrangements. If warrant is in reference to a pending case, then you may schedule a court appearance to surrender on the warrant.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/4/2012
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    If you have an attorney, it will obviously be a lot easier. If not, you need to show up at the courthouse (the earlier the better), go to the criminal business office, and add yourself on to the calendar for that day. When you talk to the judge, s/he may ask for an explanation as to why you failed to appear or did whatever you did to get the warrant. Depending on the facts and circumstances, there is always the chance that you will be remanded into custody.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/4/2012
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    It is better to have an attorney go to court instead. Going by yourself could mean you go straight to jail. If it is a misdemeanor, an attorney can go to court first without you to try to recall the warrant.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/4/2012
    Law Office of Jared C. Winter
    Law Office of Jared C. Winter | Jared C. Winter
    You should consult with a criminal defense attorney in your area before you turn yourself in.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/4/2012
    Grant & Grant
    Grant & Grant | Richard L. Grant, Esq.
    It is extremely important that you turn yourself in before you get arrested. However, it is equally important that you do not turn yourself without the assistance and presence of an experienced criminal defense attorney. If there is an arrest warrant outstanding but no criminal case filed yet, then you and your attorney should appear at the offices of law enforcement agency who had the warrant issued. If there is a pending court case and the judge issued an arrest warrant for non appearance or non compliance, then you and your attorney would appear in the court room of the judge who issued the warrant. It is also very important that your attorney arranges for a bail bondsman to be ready to immediately bail you out in the event the court sets bail which normally occurs.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/4/2012
    LynchLaw
    LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
    Yes. You can visit the criminal clerks office and ask that your case be put on the courts calendar. I would be a good idea to review the case with an attorney first.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/4/2012
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    If you have a bench warrant for your arrest the best thing for you to do is to show up at the court that issued the warrant. To do this you can go to the clerks office and tell the clerk that you are a walk in on a warrant. You can also go to the court room itself and check in with the bailiff and tell him that you are there for a warrant. If you try to turn in yourself to the police or sheriffs department you will be in jail until they can transport you to the court.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/4/2012
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    My suggestions will depend on what the warrant is for, how much it is and what you plan to do about the underlying situation that caused the warrant. If it's for a new case, talk to a lawyer before you do anything. There may be a way they can appear on your behalf and get the warrant recalled and/or get the bail lowered or have you released without having to post bail. If it's for a probation violation, it's still worth talking to an attorney to see if there's a way to correct it without you having to be arrested (such as showing proof of something or requesting an extension, etc.) If you turn yourself in to the police, they'll simply book you and you'll sit in custody for a couple of days before you're taken in front of the judge. If you turn yourself in to the court, they may take you into custody, but you may have a shot (with your lawyer) of being released. Talk to a local criminal defense attorney before you do anything. Your question is just too vague to steer you in the right direction.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/4/2012
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