How can I receive my mother's pension? 22 Answers as of June 06, 2013

My mother passed away almost 2 years ago and I recently received a letter that indicates that she might have had a pension. Is there anything that I can do about receiving the money?

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Edward L. Armstrong, P.C. | Edward L. Armstrong
It depends on the pension plan. You need to contact the former employer about claiming whatever funds are there. Your mother may have designated a beneficiary to receive funds in the event she passed prior to full payment of the benefit. If it really is a "pension" plan and your mother made no contributions to this, you may not have any right to anything. You need to contact the company. If they say they need a court order, it's too late to open a probate estate but you can begin a proceeding called "Determination of Heirship." You need an attorney to do this for you.
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 6/6/2013
Reger Rizzo & Darnall LLP | Kathleen DeLacy
Contact them to see if it passes to her beneficiaries.
Answer Applies to: Delaware
Replied: 6/6/2013
Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
You need to check with her former employer if there was a pension that survives her death.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/3/2013
Law Office of Pamela Braynon | Pamela Y. Braynon
Contact the company that is in charge of the pension to see if there was a beneficiary named for your mom's pension. They will have procedures for you to follow in order to obtain it.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 6/3/2013
Loren Lambert
Loren Lambert | Loren Lambert
Try to informally find out this information from her employer and if this doesn't work you may need to get an attorney and open a probate action. She may have designated a beneficiary to her pension if she had any type of the pension that paid after her death.
Answer Applies to: Utah
Replied: 6/3/2013
    Shimberg and Crohn, P.C. | Jonathan Shimberg
    Normally pensions do not pass on to the pensioner's children. While she might have had a pension, it does not mean you would get anything. you need to talk to the tension administrator.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Law Office Of Victor Waid
    Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
    You need to contact the pension administrator who sent you the notice and follow their procedures in making a claim.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    Not all pensions have benefits for surviving children. If the letter you received says that there are benefits available, it should also explain what you need to do to prove that you are the intended beneficiary of her pension plan. Contact the Pension Plan itself to determine if there are benefits for you to seek.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Frederick & Frederick PLC | James P Frederick
    You would need to contact the company to see if: 1) there was a death benefit, and 2) whether or not there were any beneficiaries designated. If there was no death benefit, then the pension would terminate on your mother's death. If there were beneficiaries designated, the benefits would pass to the beneficiaries outside of probate. Otherwise, probate would be necessary.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    S. Joseph Schramm | Joseph Schramm
    If you knew where your mother worked you should contact her employer to inquire. You might also learn the identity of her employer if she kept any of her old income tax return on file along with the old W-2s for the years in question. Unless you received the letter from her employer I would be suspicious of the author. At best it could be a person who is acting as a bounty hunter who searches for heirs to money being held by the state or an institution. They will charge you a percentage of what you receive. At worst, it might be the effort of a con artist who will ask for a specific amount in advance and who, after the amount is paid, will disappear.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Darrell B. Reynolds, P.C. | Darrell B. Reynolds
    You would need to probate her estate.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Law Office of Edward M. Burgh, APC | Edward M. Burgh
    It depends on what she said. Call the pension company and ask them what you need to do.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Dara Goldsmith
    Apply with her former employer for benefits. Best of luck to you. This information is only intended to give general information in response to an inquiry. It does not establish an attorney client relationship. This response is only based upon the limited facts presented and is merely intended to assist you in determining if you should contact an attorney to provide you with legal advice.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    It depends upon the amount of the money. If it is under $100,000 you can receive it by affidavit. If the are other siblings, they must consent to you receiving it.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Christine Sabio Socrates Attorney at Law | Christine Socrates
    You can call or write to the financial company where she has the pension to inquire whether you mother's pension had death benefits, continues after death and whether there was a beneficiary designated. They should be able to give you that information if you provide them a death certificate.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski
    Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski | Gerald A. Bagazinski
    You need to file a claim for benefits. I would seek a copy of the summary plan description. Ask an attorney if you have any questions.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Arthur H. Geffen, P.C.
    Arthur H. Geffen, P.C. | Arthur Geffen
    You would need to contact the company who holds the pension and find out if you are the beneficiary of the pension or whether your mother's estate is the beneficiary. If you are, they should ask you to provide a few items, if the beneficiary is the estate, they should tell you. If the beneficiary is someone other than you or the estate, then they will probably not be very helpful. You may need to hire a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Huddleston Law Group, LPA | C L Huddleston
    My answer assumes you are an adult, not a minor, and not disabled. More often than not, pensions terminate at the death of the participant or the participant's spouse. Sometimes, however, participants have the option to elect to receive a certain amount of pension, but for not less than a certain number of years. Unless you are a named beneficiary, executor of the Will or administrator of a no-Will estate, the pension administrator will not give you any information. If there is an Executor, you should contact the Executor to determine whether anyone is eligible for benefits under your mother's pension after her death.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    James Law Group
    James Law Group | Christine James
    Yes. An attorney can help you through the process. You can try to contact the company directly but they seem to respond better to attorneys.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Law Offices of Robert H. Glorch | Jeffrey R. Gottlieb
    Contact the pension administrator.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Attorney At Law | James G. Maguire
    Most pension payments terminate when the pensioner is deceased. Talk to the pension administrator to find out for sure.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    It is impossible to answer your question without further information. It will be determined by the terms of the pension contract.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/3/2013
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