How can I keep a parolee from living with me? 4 Answers as of May 17, 2011

My husbands brother is being paroled and he's says he's coming to live with us. Our home belongs to my husband and his two brothers. However the property is in the name of his deceased mother and my husband alone has continued to pay for the home since 16 years. The house only has 2 bedrooms and my 2 children share one while my husband and I share the other. One year ago one of his brothers was released from prison so we felt forced to make room for him, now his other brother is being released and we have no room for him at all! Not only do they never help with anything financial but also they both have a long history of violence and crack cocaine usage. This is a very uncomfortable situation for my family and me. Is there anything we can do to keep them away and take our home back? Probate is not an option.

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Law Office of Joseph A. Katz
Law Office of Joseph A. Katz | Joseph A. Katz
Yes. Did you try contacting his Parole Agent and informing him that he cannot live at that address, and that there is already another parolee living there?
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/17/2011
Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
You have to take a stand and simply say no, as does your husband. They have no right to force their way into your home, even if they are on title. But if they are on title, and your husband wont say no, you have a problem without an easy solution. Theoretically, you could call the police and demand to have them taken out as trespassers, but police are going to be hesitant to remove someone claiming residence and ownership. You could contact their parole / probation officers and complain and demand removal. If you and your husband agreed, you could file an unlawful detainer against the one there. At some point the ownership and share and payment credit issues on the house will have to be handled. Maybe now is the time.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/17/2011
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
You can get a restraining order against him.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/16/2011
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
Speak with a real estate attorney. Especially one who knows and understands restraining orders.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/16/2011
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